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I'm dealing with an union in C++, and I would like have a function template which access to the active union member depending on a template parameter.

Code is something like (doSomething is just an example):

union Union {
  int16_t i16;
  int32_t i32;
};

enum class ActiveMember {
    I16 
  , I32
}

template <ActiveMember M>
void doSomething(Union a, const Union b) {
  selectMemeber(a, M) = selectMember(b, M);
  // this would be exactly (not equivalent) the same
  // that a.X = b.X depending on T.
}

To accomplish this I only found bad hacks like specialization, or a not homogeneous way to access and assign.

I'm missing something, and such things should be do it with other approach?

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3  
why do you think specialization is a "bad hack"? there is no such thing as "static if" in C++ (yet), so I don't see any other way of doing that than defining separate templates. i might be wrong though –  Andy Prowl Jan 17 '13 at 9:15
    
I guess you mean selectMemeber(a, M) = selectMember(b, M); ? –  Philipp Jan 17 '13 at 9:26
    
@Philipp, yes, thanks!. Edited. –  user1476999 Jan 17 '13 at 9:29
1  
I think there might be a nice solution via a pointer to member, but I'm not yet sure if that's legal. See stackoverflow.com/questions/14375965/… –  MSalters Jan 17 '13 at 9:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Possibility 1

instead of using an enum, you can use simple structs to pick the member:

typedef short int16_t;
typedef long int32_t;

union Union {
    int16_t i16;
    int32_t i32;
};

struct ActiveMemberI16 {};
struct ActiveMemberI32 {};

template <typename M>
void doSomething(Union& a, Union b) {
    selectMember(a, M()) = selectMember(b, M());

    // this would be exactly (not equivalent) the same
    // that a.X = b.X depending on T.
}

int16_t& selectMember(Union& u, ActiveMemberI16)
{
    return u.i16;
}

int32_t& selectMember(Union& u, ActiveMemberI32)
{
    return u.i32;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Union a,b;
    a.i16 = 0;
    b.i16 = 1;
    doSomething<ActiveMemberI16>(a,b);
    std::cout << a.i16 << std::endl;

    b.i32 = 3;
    doSomething<ActiveMemberI32>(a,b);
    std::cout << a.i32 << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

This requires to define a struct and a selectMember method for every member in the union, but at least you can use selectMember across many other functions.

Note that I turned the arguments to references, you might adjust this if not appropriate.

Possibility 2

By casting the union pointer to the desired type pointer, you can go with a single selectMember function.

typedef short int16_t;
typedef long int32_t;

union Union {
    int16_t i16;
    int32_t i32;
};
template <typename T>
T& selectMember(Union& u)
{
    return *((T*)&u);
}

template <typename M>
void doSomething(Union& a, Union b) {
    selectMember<M>(a) = selectMember<M>(b);

    // this would be exactly (not equivalent) the same
    // that a.X = b.X depending on T.
}



int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Union a,b;
    a.i16 = 0;
    b.i16 = 1;

    doSomething<int16_t>(a,b);
    std::cout << a.i16 << std::endl;

    b.i32 = 100000;
    doSomething<int32_t>(a,b);
    std::cout << a.i32 << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for Possibility 2. did not come to my mind, well done –  Andy Prowl Jan 17 '13 at 9:51
    
I thought about possibility 2, but it seemed to me that was illegal. I'm reading and looks like I was wrong. Thanks –  user1476999 Jan 17 '13 at 9:53
    
Potatoswatter came up with the same idea in my question; it's indeed the simplest solution. –  MSalters Jan 17 '13 at 9:54
    
What about endianness on option 2? If we cast the pointer of the variable to another, there is no guarantee of compiler that it will give us least significant values. Isn't it? –  Halil Kaskavalci Apr 10 at 13:08

I'm not sure why you consider template specialization a "bad hack", but there is no such a thing as "static if" in C++, so if you want your compiler to differentiate the code produced based on the result of an expression evaluated at compile-time, you need to define different, specialized versions of the template.

Here is how you would define it:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

union Union {
  int16_t int16;
  int32_t int32;
};

enum class ActiveMember {
    INT16
  , INT32
};

// Declare primary template
template <ActiveMember M>
void doSomething(Union a, const Union b);

// First specialization
template <>
void doSomething<ActiveMember::INT16>(Union a, const Union b)
{
    a.int16 = b.int16;

    // Do what you want here...
    cout << "int16" << endl;
}

// Second specialization
template <>
void doSomething<ActiveMember::INT32>(Union a, const Union b)
{
    a.int32 = b.int32;

    // Do what you want here...
    cout << "int32" << endl;
}

And this is how you would use it.

int main()
{
    Union u1, u2;
    u1.int32 = 0;
    u2.int32 = 0;

    doSomething<ActiveMember::INT16>(u1, u2);
    doSomething<ActiveMember::INT32>(u1, u2);

    return 0;
}
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1  
Because specialization is not a extensible solution, in this case involves rewriting the code. Of course for this example probably is the best option (the more simple). But because there are just one function and two members, but what if you need to write several function and there are ten members? –  user1476999 Jan 17 '13 at 9:26
    
@user1476999: You can always factor the code so that you only need one template that needs to be specialized, like get<M>(u). Then you can use that generically in all your other functions. –  Kerrek SB Jan 17 '13 at 9:30
    
@user1476999: two considerations. first: what would be the return type of your selectMember function? since you are working on a union, the return type would depend on the value of M. second: if C++ supported something like "static_if", that would allow conditionals evaluated at compile-time (so that the false branch won't even get compiled), that would make things easier and require no specialization. unfortunately, we don't have the feature at the moment. there are proposals to add it to the next standard though –  Andy Prowl Jan 17 '13 at 9:30
    
@AndyProwl but selectMember can be anything, not a "function". For example, if exists a safe way to cast from a union member type to a type, selectMember(u, M) can be something like UnionType<M>::type &ref{u}; so you only need to add some traits. Or can be a macro like selectMember(u, M) u##fromMemberToMemberIdentifier(M). Maybe don't exists a way, but in principle this envolves only pattern mathing and rewrite (templates + macros). Of course, as you say, C++ has limitations and maybe is just impossible what i'm try to do. –  user1476999 Jan 17 '13 at 9:44
    
@user1476999: i see what you mean. maybe Possibility 2 in Philipp's answer does what you are looking for –  Andy Prowl Jan 17 '13 at 9:51

The only solution that i can think about is to add operators to the union:

union Union
{
    char c;
    short s;
    int i;
    float f;
    double d;

    operator char() const { return c; }
    operator short() const { return s; }
    operator int() const { return i; }
    operator float() const { return f; }
    operator double() const { return d; }
    template <typename T> operator T() const { /* invalid conversion */ T t; return t; }

    Union &operator =(char ac) { c = ac; return *this; }
    Union &operator =(short as) { s = as; return *this; }
    Union &operator =(int ai) { i = ai; return *this; }
    Union &operator =(float af) { f = af; return *this; }
    Union &operator =(double ad) { d = ad; return *this; }
    template <typename T> Union &operator =(T at) { /* invalid asignement */ return *this; }
};

It allows you to control the behaviour of the union when it works as a some type:

template <typename T>
void doSomething(Union a, const Union b)
{
    // call the 'b' conversion operator and the 'a' asignment operator.
    a = static_cast<T>(b);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Union a, b;

    doSomething<int>(a, b);  // calls a.i = b.i
    doSomething<char>(a, b); // calls a.c = b.c

    return 0;
}

The template version of the operators matches the invalid conversions.

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