Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have not used the csv module in python before, but it seems like a great tool to use for my needs.

The problem I am facing is that my csv-file looks a bit strange. (it was hard to notice at first)

See the example below for what I mean:

A|B|C|D|x|F|G|x|H
1||2||3|4||5|6
1||2||3|4||5|6
1||2||3|4||5|6
1||2||3|4||5|6

There are some indexes (such as column-x) above which should be read as Dx and Gx. The D-column and G-column are then empty columns.

So what I need is that when csv is processing the header it should create the headers like Dx and Gx and neglect the D and G columns and take the value from the x-column instead.

(I tried to read the file as is with the following code first and post process it, but it is not possible since the column name x is always the same, and csv.DictReader seems to discard repetitive column-names)

with open('myCSV.log') as csvFile:
    reader = csv.DictReader(csvFile, dialect='pipes')
    for row in reader:
        print row

Can this be achieved with a dialect, or some other fancy way of configuring the csv-module or do I have to parse this myself?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use pandas:

import pandas as pd
print pd.read_csv('test.csv',sep='|')

out:

   A   B  C   D  x  F   G  x.1  H
0  1 NaN  2 NaN  3  4 NaN    5  6
1  1 NaN  2 NaN  3  4 NaN    5  6
2  1 NaN  2 NaN  3  4 NaN    5  6
3  1 NaN  2 NaN  3  4 NaN    5  6

and if you need you can convert it to a dict using to_dict() method:

{'A': {0: 1, 1: 1, 2: 1, 3: 1},
 'B': {0: nan, 1: nan, 2: nan, 3: nan},
 'C': {0: 2, 1: 2, 2: 2, 3: 2},
 'D': {0: nan, 1: nan, 2: nan, 3: nan},
 'F': {0: 4, 1: 4, 2: 4, 3: 4},
 'G': {0: nan, 1: nan, 2: nan, 3: nan},
 'H': {0: 6, 1: 6, 2: 6, 3: 6},
 'x': {0: 3, 1: 3, 2: 3, 3: 3},
 'x.1': {0: 5, 1: 5, 2: 5, 3: 5}}

EDIT: If you need certain names for columns you can do this:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.read_csv('test.csv',sep='|')
df.columns = [df.columns[index-1]+'x' if 'x' in name 
              else name for index,name in enumerate(df.columns)]
print df

   A   B  C   D  Dx  F   G  Gx  H
0  1 NaN  2 NaN   3  4 NaN   5  6
1  1 NaN  2 NaN   3  4 NaN   5  6
2  1 NaN  2 NaN   3  4 NaN   5  6
3  1 NaN  2 NaN   3  4 NaN   5  6

If you want to lose the empty cols:

print df.dropna(axis=1,how='all')

   A  C  Dx  F  Gx  H
0  1  2   3  4   5  6
1  1  2   3  4   5  6
2  1  2   3  4   5  6
3  1  2   3  4   5  6
share|improve this answer
    
thank, pandas is new to me. However looking at your example, it seems like something I can not use. The first x column is named x, the second one is x.1 and I suppose that this continues for remaining x, meaning that I have lost the original name of the columns and replaced with something else. –  theAlse Jan 17 '13 at 9:35
    
thanks, could you please provide your code! –  theAlse Jan 17 '13 at 9:57
    
python magic, could you rewrite the online as an ugly for-loop (and if else ) so I can understand this better. –  theAlse Jan 17 '13 at 10:30
    
your code works, but x.1 is not in x! –  theAlse Jan 17 '13 at 10:46
    
I am accepting your answer! it should be the way to go, but I choose actually to parse the file myself in the end. –  theAlse Jan 18 '13 at 14:18

I think reading the file and post-processing it is indeed the way to go. Just don't use DictReader:

with open('myCSV.log') as csvFile:
    for row in csv.reader(csvFile, delimiter='|'):
        print row


['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'x', 'F', 'G', 'x', 'H']
['1', '', '2', '', '3', '4', '', '5', '6']
['1', '', '2', '', '3', '4', '', '5', '6']
['1', '', '2', '', '3', '4', '', '5', '6']
['1', '', '2', '', '3', '4', '', '5', '6']
share|improve this answer

You have nine headers and nine columns, and I don't really see a problem with the .csv except for the doubled columnheaders. You can override the fieldnames in the DictReader, to rename these. Also, if you want to rename the column 'D' to 'Dx', it can be done with this parameter. .

import csv
from pprint import pprint
with open('testfile.csv') as csvFile:
reader = csv.DictReader(csvFile, fieldnames = ['A','B','C','meh','Dx','F','moe','Gx','H'], delimiter = '|'  )
for row in reader:
        pprint(row)

Using dialects here doesn't really seem necessary here! This is my testoutput, where the first line is now the header.

{'A': 'A',
 'B': 'B',
 'C': 'C',
 'Dx': 'x',
 'F': 'F',
 'Gx': 'x',
 'H': 'H',
 'meh': 'D',
 'moe': 'G'}
{'A': '1',
 'B': '',
 'C': '2',
 'Dx': '3',
 'F': '4',
 'Gx': '5',
 'H': '6',
 'meh': '',
 'moe': ''}
 ....
share|improve this answer
    
this was just an example, the real file is dynamic with many columns (over 100 columns). What I need is something much more dynamic! –  theAlse Jan 17 '13 at 9:39
    
But then you can dynamically pass the fieldnames parameter! –  Gijs Jan 17 '13 at 9:41
    
I don´t even know the exact name of the columns. I just know the name of the x-columns. –  theAlse Jan 17 '13 at 9:45
    
Then you will have to first read the header, generate a suitable fieldnames list, and then parse the file, I guess. –  Gijs Jan 17 '13 at 9:58
from StringIO import StringIO
import csv

with open('test.csv') as f:
    lines = f.read().split('\n')
    line_0 = lines[0].split('|')
    lines[0] = '|'.join(line_0[i-1] if 'x' in n else n for i,n in 
                                               enumerate(line_0))

    reader = csv.DictReader(StringIO('\n'.join(lines)),delimiter = '|' )
    for row in reader:
        print row

out:

{'A': '1', 'C': '2', 'B': '', 'D': '3', 'G': '5', 'F': '4', 'H': '6'}
{'A': '1', 'C': '2', 'B': '', 'D': '3', 'G': '5', 'F': '4', 'H': '6'}
{'A': '1', 'C': '2', 'B': '', 'D': '3', 'G': '5', 'F': '4', 'H': '6'}
{'A': '1', 'C': '2', 'B': '', 'D': '3', 'G': '5', 'F': '4', 'H': '6'}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.