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the sample in the text from the dump is -

s='[[Pierre-Joseph Proudhon|Proudhon]], [[Peter Kropotkin|Kropotkin]], [[Mikhail Bakunin|Bakunin]]'

when I run the regexp given as -

match_internal=re.findall('\[\[(.+)\]\]',s)
for i in match_internal:
    print i
>>Pierre-Joseph Proudhon|Proudhon]], [[Peter Kropotkin|Kropotkin]], [[Mikhail Bakunin|Bakunin

Rather than printing

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon|Proudhon
Peter Kropotkin|Kropotkin
Mikhail Bakunin|Bakunin
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to use reluctant quantifier instead of greedy one: -

re.findall('\[\[(.+?)\]\]',s)  // Replaced `.+` with `.+?`

With greedy quantifier - your pattern - (.+) will match all the string till the last ]], and with reluctant quantifier - pattern - (.+?) will stop at the first ]].

>>> match_internal=re.findall('\[\[(.+?)\]\]',s)
>>> for i in match_internal:
        print i

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon|Proudhon
Peter Kropotkin|Kropotkin
Mikhail Bakunin|Bakunin
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Thanks for the answer. –  minocha Jan 17 '13 at 9:58
    
@minocha.. you're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Jan 17 '13 at 9:58
    
But just for the info regexp are supposed to stop whenever they see a match to the expression given as the pattern.. why the confusion regarding the greedy approach here then? –  minocha Jan 17 '13 at 9:59
1  
@minocha.. In Regex, quantifiers are by default greedy, in the sense that, they will try to match as much string as possible, that allows the remaining string to satisfying the following pattern. It will make sure that the pattern matches the string. –  Rohit Jain Jan 17 '13 at 10:01
    
@minocha.. However, you can make those quantifier non-greedy or reluctant, by adding an extra ? after them. So, .+ becomes .+?, in which case, they will match the string till the first occurrence of the character matching the following pattern. So, .+?[a-zA-Z] will match the string till the first alphabet is found. And .+[a-zA-Z] will the match the string till the last alphabet in the string. –  Rohit Jain Jan 17 '13 at 10:03
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The + quantifier matches as much as possible by default. And since the . matches all characters in your string, there is only a single match, excluding only the outermost brackets.

You should search for "non-bracket" characters inside the brackets like this:

re.findall('\[\[([^\]]+)\]\]', s)
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while i generally agree with this approach, as using a . is dangerous sometimes, it seems that the data the OP is using might include single brackets because his groups are closed with double brackets, in this case, it might not be good enough. –  Inbar Rose Jan 17 '13 at 9:52
    
@InbarRose is right, there might be an external link within the double square brackets which might be represented by text enclosed within single square brackets in the wiki dump.. in that case it might not work.. –  minocha Jan 17 '13 at 9:56
    
That is correct - point taken. –  Johannes Charra Jan 17 '13 at 10:04
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