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Here is my code for factory method pattern

public abstract class TestAbstract
{
    public abstract void MainFunc();
}

public class ClassA : TestAbstract
{
    public override void MainFunc()
    {
        //code for line 1
        //code for line 2
        //...
        Func1();
        Func2();
        //code for line 10
    }
    private void Func1() { }
    private void Func2() { }
}
public class ClassB : TestAbstract
{
    public override void MainFunc()
    {
        //code for line 1
        //code for line 2
        //...
        Func1();
        Func2();
        //code for line 10
    }
    private void Func1() { }
    private void Func2() { }
}

Currently, function MainFunc in both of ClassA and ClassB has several lines are the same. And I don't want to repeat code in these classes. I move MainFunc to TestAbstract class but it didn't work.

What I want here is how can I just have one MainFunc for both Classes, and it could call 2 functions Func1 and Func2 in each class correct.

Thank you very much.

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5 Answers

Do you mean template method pattern? If I understand you correctly, try the below, and make Func1 and Func2 as override in the sub classes.

public abstract class TestAbstract
{
    public void MainFunc(){ 
        //code for line 1
        //code for line 2
        //...
        Func1();
        Func2();
        //code for line 10
    }

    protected abstract void Func1();
    protected abstract void Func2();
}

For MainFunc to call Func1 and Func2, it needs to know that they exist.

share|improve this answer
    
you probably meant public abstract or protected abstract for Func1 and Func2 –  Paolo Falabella Jan 17 '13 at 10:02
    
Yes. I'll see this solution. Thanks for your help. –  Lang thang Jan 18 '13 at 8:46
    
@PaoloFalabella Ideally no, the template method should be the only one being called from outside. It shouldnt be non private unless it needs to be non private –  Karthik T Jan 18 '13 at 8:59
    
@KarthikT but you must be able to override Func1 and Func2 in the subclasses and you can't if they are private. You should make them protected if Func1 and Func2 don't need to get called from the outside. Try compiling your code, you should get a virtual or abstract members cannot be private compilation error. –  Paolo Falabella Jan 18 '13 at 9:30
    
@PaoloFalabella ah apologies, I was going on C++ rules, didnt realize they differed here.. –  Karthik T Jan 18 '13 at 9:34
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This is called "template method pattern". MainFunc can live in the abstract class and call methods Func1 and Func2 that you specialize in your derived classes.

public abstract class TestAbstract
{
    public void MainFunc() 
    { 
        //common code
        Func1();
        Func2(); 
    }

    // you can make these protected instead of public
    // if they are not meant to be called directly outside of your
    // derived classes    
    public abstract void Func1(); 
    public abstract void Func2();
}

public class ClassA : TestAbstract 
{
    public void Func1() 
    { //... logic for ClassA
    }

    public void Func2() 
    { //... logic for ClassA 
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for making methods either non-virtual (final if it were Java) or abstract, which usually makes the interface clearer and implementations more stable. –  Matthias Meid Jan 17 '13 at 10:10
    
year. Thank you so much. I've applied it success. –  Lang thang Jan 18 '13 at 8:46
1  
not template pattern but template method pattern –  sll Jan 18 '13 at 9:39
    
@sll you're right, thanks, I remembered the name badly. Corrected. –  Paolo Falabella Jan 18 '13 at 9:48
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You can move MainFunc to TestAbstract, but you have to declare Func1 and Func2 there then as abstract functions.

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Yes. Just like above solution. Thanks for your help. –  Lang thang Jan 18 '13 at 8:47
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In this example ClassA just executes Func1 and Func2 from TestAbstract, ClassB overrides the the functions. Please notice the base.MainFunction as you wanted extra code in the overriden MainFunction

void Main()
{
    ClassA a = new ClassA();
    a.MainFunc();
}

public class TestAbstract
{
    public virtual void MainFunc()
    {
    Func1();
    Func2();
    }
    public virtual void Func1() { "func1".Dump();}
    public virtual void Func2() { "func2".Dump();}
}

public class ClassA : TestAbstract
{
    public override void MainFunc()
    {
        //code for line 1
        //code for line 2
        //...
 base.MainFunc();
        //code for line 10
    }

}
public class ClassB : TestAbstract
{
    public override void MainFunc()
    {
        //code for line 1
        //code for line 2
        //...
        base.MainFunc();
        //code for line 10
    }
    public override void Func1() { "func1".Dump();}
    public override void Func2() { }
}
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Yes. I'll see this solution. Thanks for your help. –  Lang thang Jan 18 '13 at 8:49
add comment

instead of using abstract use virtual for your MainFunc if you're willing to modify the logic or just a simple MainFunc in your abstract class

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Yes. I'll see this solution. Thanks for your help. –  Lang thang Jan 18 '13 at 8:50
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