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i am currently working on a simple ipad webapp testpiece and got stuck in a simple switch statement that doesn´t work somehow; i want to format elements according to javascripts window.location string. This might be embarassing simple to fix; but i somehow don´t get it: Or is there something special about the window.location?

$(document).ready(function() {
path_c = window.location;
switch (path_c){
    case "http://192.168.1.37/ryba_testground/":
    $('#menu-item-22').addClass('current_page_item');
    alert(path_c);
    break;
    case "http://192.168.1.37/ryba_testground/?page_id=7":
    $('#menu-item-21').addClass('current_page_item');
    break; 
    case "http://192.168.1.37/ryba_testground/?page_id=9":
    $('#menu-item-20').addClass('current_page_item');
    break;
    case "http://192.168.1.37/ryba_testground/?page_id=11":
    $('#menu-item-19').addClass('current_page_item');
    break;
}
});

THX!

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5  
Yes, it is a host object. Try window.location.href –  Bergi Jan 17 '13 at 10:39
    
google might had helped! also a debugger..... –  mercsen Jan 17 '13 at 10:43

5 Answers 5

Or is there something special about the window.location?

It's a host object, which sometimes act unpredictable. At least, it is an object which evaluates to the href when casted to a string - yet that does not happen when comparing with the switch-cases. Use

var path_c = window.location.href;
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window.location returns a Location object, which contains information about the URL of the document and provides methods for changing that URL. So change it to:

var path_c = window.location.href;
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I think you want the href property of the window.location object.

path_c = window.location.href;

Full Script

$(document).ready(function() {
    path_c = window.location.href;

    switch (path_c){
        case "http://192.168.1.37/ryba_testground/":
        $('#menu-item-22').addClass('current_page_item');
        alert(path_c);
        break;
        case "http://192.168.1.37/ryba_testground/?page_id=7":
        $('#menu-item-21').addClass('current_page_item');
        break; 
        case "http://192.168.1.37/ryba_testground/?page_id=9":
        $('#menu-item-20').addClass('current_page_item');
        break;
        case "http://192.168.1.37/ryba_testground/?page_id=11":
        $('#menu-item-19').addClass('current_page_item');
        break;
    }
});

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/9vjY9/

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The code seems ok. Try to alert (window.location.href) or console.log(window.location.href), then you can check exactly what does window.location.href gets for each page you test. This might reveal the problem.

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You can use window.location.toString() or window.location.href, you even can avoid using switch, with a object map and regular expression to filter your target in url:

var page_idMap = {
    '7': '#menu-item-21',
    '9': '#menu-item-20',
    '11': '#menu-item-19'
}
var id = window.location.href.match(/page_id[=]([0-9]+)/i);
if (!id || !page_idMap(id[1])) {
    $('#menu-item-22').addClass('current_page_item');
} else {
    $(page_idMap[id[1]]).addClass('current_page_item');
}
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