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I would like to know what exactly is the difference between querySelector and querySelectorAll against getElementsByClassName and getElementById?

From this link I could gather that with querySelector I can write document.querySelector(".myclass") to get elements with class myclass and document.querySelector("#myid") to get element with ID myid. But I can already do that getElementsByClassName and getElementById. Which one should be preferred?

Also I work in XPages where the ID is dynamically generated with colon and looks like this view:_id1:inputText1. So when I write document.querySelector("#view:_id1:inputText1") it doesn't work. But writing document.getElementById("view:_id1:inputText1") works. Any ideas why?

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querySelector is used for querying a HTML DOM tree which can include html element and its attributes as key elements for querying... you can use regular expression to achieve this.. dojo.query() does the same thing –  anix Jan 25 '13 at 13:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I would like to know what exactly is the difference between querySelector and querySelectorAll against getElementsByClassName and getElementById?

The syntax and the browser support.

querySelector is more useful when you want to use more complex selectors.

e.g. All list items descended from an element that is a member of the foo class: .foo li

document.querySelector("#view:_id1:inputText1") it doesn't work. But writing document.getElementById("view:_id1:inputText1") works. Any ideas why?

The : character has special meaning inside a selector. You have to escape it. (The selector escape character has special meaning in a JS string too, so you have to escape that too).

document.querySelector("#view\\:_id1\\:inputText1")
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Any ideas on performance, like which is better? –  Naveen Jan 17 '13 at 11:16
    
It will vary from browser to browser (and from version to version). I'd assume that selector based ones were more expensive (but not in a way that will ever likely to be significant) –  Quentin Jan 17 '13 at 11:18
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@Naveen JSPerf to the rescue! jsperf.com/getelementbyid-vs-queryselector –  msanford Jul 27 '13 at 3:55
    
@Naveen For classes: jsperf.com/… but keep in mind that the difference between getElementsByClassName and querySelect* is IE8 and IE9: caniuse.com/#feat=getelementsbyclassname. –  Tres Nov 27 '13 at 23:37
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@Naveen: an updated link for the one earlier reported by msanford: jsperf.com/getelementbyid-vs-queryselector/11. You can see that for simple cases getElementById vastly outperforms querySelector. Whether it will make any real-life difference for you depends on your application. The link also has a nice tip about how to transparently combine the two. –  Sergey Shevchenko Dec 9 '13 at 21:35

querySelector and querySelectorAll are a relatively new APIs, whereas getElementById and getElementsByClassName have been with us for a lot longer. That means that what you use will mostly depend on which browsers you need to support.

As for the :, it has a special meaning so you have to escape it if you have to use it as a part of a ID/class name.

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Any ideas on performance, like which is better? –  Naveen Jan 17 '13 at 11:15
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This is not necessarily true. For example, querySelectorAll is available in IE8, whereas getElementsByClassName isn't. –  Daveyjoe Apr 29 '13 at 22:35

querySelector can be a complete CSS-Selector with IDs and Classes and Pseudo-Classes together like this:

'#id.class:pseudo'

with getElementByClassName you can just define a class

'.class'

with getElementById you can just define an id

'#id'
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Is :first a CSS selector, now? :first-class, or :first-of-type maybe, but I thought :first was a JavaScript/jQuery/Sizzle addition. –  David Thomas Jan 17 '13 at 11:03
    
I just wanted to show you, that :pseudo-syntax is possible –  algorhythm Jan 17 '13 at 11:05
    
@DavidThomas Yes it is, it is part of CSS3. It can be used like this: css-tricks.com/almanac/selectors/f/first-child –  algorhythm Jan 15 at 8:18
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but :first is, noticeably, not :first-child. –  David Thomas Jan 15 at 8:36
    
@DavidThomas You are right, thx, now it's clear. –  algorhythm Jan 15 at 8:37

collecting from Mozilla Documentation:

The NodeSelector interface This specification adds two new methods to any objects implementing the Document, DocumentFragment, or Element interfaces:

querySelector

Returns the first matching Element node within the node's subtree. If no matching node is found, null is returned.

querySelectorAll

Returns a NodeList containing all matching Element nodes within the node's subtree, or an empty NodeList if no matches are found.

and

Note: The NodeList returned by querySelectorAll() is not live. This is different from other DOM querying methods that return live node lists.

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