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I have a sequence of generators: (gen_0, gen_1, ... gen_n)

These generators will create their values lazily but are finite and will have potentially different lengths.

I need to be able to construct another generator that yields the first element of each generator in order, followed by the second and so forth, skipping values from generators that have been exhausted.

I think this problem is analogous to taking the tuple

((1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16), (2, 5, 8, 11, 14), (3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 17, 18))

and traversing it so that it would yield the numbers from 1 through 18 in order.

I'm working on solving this simple example using (genA, genB, genC) with genA yielding values from (1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16), genB yielding (2, 5, 8, 11, 14) and genC yielding (3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 17, 18).

To solve the simpler problem with the tuple of tuples the answer is fairly simple if the elements of the tuple were the same length. If the variable 'a' referred to the tuple, you could use

[i for t in zip(*a) for i in t]

Unfortunately the items are not necessarily the same length and the zip trick doesn't seem to work for generators anyway.

So far my code is horribly ugly and I'm failing to find anything approaching a clean solution. Help?

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itertools.izip_longest; you can pass a sentinel to pad the generators that run out. If you want you can then filter that sentinel out of the results. –  katrielalex Jan 17 '13 at 11:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might consider itertools.izip_longest, but in case None is a valid value, that solution will fail. Here is a sample "another generator", which does exactly what you asked for, and is pretty clean:

def my_gen(generators):
    while True:
        rez = () 
        for gen in generators:
            try:
                rez = rez + (gen.next(),)
            except StopIteration:
                pass
        if rez:
            yield rez
        else:
            break

print [x for x in my_gen((iter(xrange(2)), iter(xrange(3)), iter(xrange(1))))]

[(0, 0, 0), (1, 1), (2,)] #output
share|improve this answer
    
You can use iter(range(x)) instead of simple_gen(x). –  Gareth Rees Jan 17 '13 at 12:05
    
Or better yet: iter(xrange(x)) on Python 2.x. –  phant0m Jan 17 '13 at 12:08
    
Thanks, I'll fix. –  gg.kaspersky Jan 17 '13 at 12:18
    
Thanks for all the answers. This last one does exactly what I wanted in a way that I can understand. For the purposes of the code I'm writing though, the itertools.izip_longest based solutions will be used for performance reasons. Another case of me reading the documentation but not seeing the possible uses... –  Sean Holdsworth Jan 17 '13 at 14:52

I think you need itertools.izip_longest

>>> list([e for e in t if  e is not None] for t in itertools.izip_longest(*some_gen,
                                                               fillvalue=None))
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9], [10, 11, 12], [13, 14, 15], [16, 17], [18]]
>>> 
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2  
I'd suggest to use "if e is not None". –  gg.kaspersky Jan 17 '13 at 11:32
2  
Also, what if None was a valid value? –  gg.kaspersky Jan 17 '13 at 11:49
    
It's easy to handle the case of None and keep this approach. Simply add a line sentinel = object() beforehand, and then use e is not sentinel and fillvalue=sentinel. –  DSM Jan 17 '13 at 16:45
    
[Ah, I just noticed that @katriealex beat me by many hours to that suggestion. I'll leave the comment but acknowledge its late-to-the-party nature..] –  DSM Jan 17 '13 at 17:41

If you look at the documentation for itertools.izip_longest, you'll see that it gives a pure-Python implementation. It's easy to modify this implementation so that it produces the results you need instead (that is, just like izip_longest, but without any fillvalue):

class ZipExhausted(Exception):
    pass

def izip_longest_nofill(*args):
    """
    Return a generator whose .next() method returns a tuple where the
    i-th element comes from the i-th iterable argument that has not
    yet been exhausted. The .next() method continues until all
    iterables in the argument sequence have been exhausted and then it
    raises StopIteration.

    >>> list(izip_longest_nofill(*[xrange(i,2*i) for i in 2,3,5]))
    [(2, 3, 5), (3, 4, 6), (5, 7), (8,), (9,)]
    """
    iterators = map(iter, args)
    def zip_next():
        i = 0
        while i < len(iterators):
            try:
                yield next(iterators[i])
                i += 1
            except StopIteration:
                del iterators[i]
        if i == 0:
            raise ZipExhausted
    try:
        while iterators:
            yield tuple(zip_next())
    except ZipExhausted:
        pass

This avoids the need to re-filter the output of izip_longest to discard the fillvalues. Alternatively, if you want a "flattened" output:

def iter_round_robin(*args):
    """
    Return a generator whose .next() method cycles round the iterable
    arguments in turn (ignoring ones that have been exhausted). The
    .next() method continues until all iterables in the argument
    sequence have been exhausted and then it raises StopIteration.

    >>> list(iter_round_robin(*[xrange(i) for i in 2,3,5]))
    [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 4]
    """
    iterators = map(iter, args)
    while iterators:
        i = 0
        while i < len(iterators):
            try:
                yield next(iterators[i])
                i += 1
            except StopIteration:
                del iterators[i]
share|improve this answer

Another itertools option if you want them all collapsed in a single list; this (as @gg.kaspersky already pointed out in another thread) does not handle generated None values.

g = (generator1, generator2, generator3)

res = [e for e in itertools.chain(*itertools.izip_longest(*g)) if e is not None]
print res

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]
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