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I have faced an issue when using a variable as a condition for XPath evaluation. I have the following template which works fine:

<xsl:template name="typeReasonDic">
    <xsl:variable name="dic" select="$schema//xs:simpleType[@name = 'type_reason_et']"/>
    <!-- do something with the variable -->
</xsl:template>

However, when I change it to look like this:

<xsl:template name="typeReasonDic">
    <xsl:param name="choose_dic" select="@name = 'type_reason_et'"/>

    <xsl:variable name="dic" select="$schema//xs:simpleType[$choose_dic]"/>
    <!-- do something with the variable -->
</xsl:template>

it fails to find the desired node.

What I wish to get is a template with a default value for $choose_dic which can be overriden where necessary.

What am I missing here?

UPD: there is this link I found with the description of what I'm trying to do, but it doesn't seem to work for me.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't do this directly in XSLT 1.0 or 2.0 without an extension function. The problem is that with

<xsl:template name="typeReasonDic">
    <xsl:param name="choose_dic" select="@name = 'type_reason_et'"/>

    <xsl:variable name="dic" select="$schema//xs:simpleType[$choose_dic]"/>
    <!-- do something with the variable -->
</xsl:template>

the <xsl:param> will evaluate its select expression a single time in the current context and store the true/false result of this evaluation in the $choose_dic variable. The <xsl:variable> will therefore select either all xs:simpleType elements under the $schema (if $choose_dic is true) or none of them (if $choose_dic) is false. This is very different from

<xsl:variable name="dic" select="$schema//xs:simpleType[@name = 'type_reason_et']"/>

which will evaluate @name = 'type_reason_et' repeatedly, in the context of each xsl:simpleType, and select those elements for which the expression evaluated to true.

If you store the XPath expression as a string you can use an extension function such as dyn:evaluate or the XSLT 3.0 xsl:evaluate element if you're using Saxon.

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By doing

<xsl:param name="choose_dic" select="@name = 'type_reason_et'"/>

the XSL engine will try to evaluate "@name = 'type_reason_et'" as an XPath expression, and will assign the RESULT to your variable.

You should use the following variable declaration instead:

<xsl:param name="choose_dic">@name = 'type_reason_et'</xsl:param>

This is the default value, but you can override it when you call your template by using xsl:with-param.

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See the link in my updated question. The accepted answer there seems to do exactly what I'm trying to do. I tried to replace the <xsl:param> with <xsl:variable> but it still doesn't work. –  svz Jan 17 '13 at 11:36
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XSLT is not a macro language where you might be able to concatenate your code at run-time from strings and then evaluate them dynamically. So in general for your purpose you would need an extension function to evaluate an XPath expression stored in a string or you need to look into a new XSLT 3.0 features like http://www.saxonica.com/documentation/xsl-elements/evaluate.xml.

What is possible in the scope of XSLT 1.0 or 2.0 is doing e.g.

<xsl:param name="p1" select="'foo'"/>

<xsl:variable name="v1" select="//bar[@att = $p1]"/>

where the param holds a value you compare to other value, for instance those in a node like an attribute or element node.

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But what if I need to alter the condition to be &lt;, for example. And how come there is an accepted answer on what I'm trying to do? See the link in my question update. –  svz Jan 17 '13 at 11:51
    
If you didn't accept the answer, I don't know who did. Everything said in that answer is correct. But perhaps you've confused things by changing the question after getting an answer - personally I think that's best avoided. –  Michael Kay Jan 17 '13 at 14:10
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