Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I set up a WebApi Controller that is supposed to return a collection of objects which are of different type. Please have a short look at my dummy code:

interface IDish
{
    int ID { get; set; }
    string Name { get; set; }
}

class Steak : IDish
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string CookingStyle { get; set; }
    public int Weight { get; set; }
}

class Soup : IDish
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

class Dessert : IDish
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool ContainsSugar { get; set; }
}

public class DishController : ApiController
{
    public IEnumerable<IDish> Get()
    {
        var dishes = busisnessLogic.GetDishes();
        return dishes;
    }
}

As you can see, in the controller I'm retrieving a collection of IDishes from my business logic. Please don't pay too much attention to the concrete classes. They are just samples to make the things easier to explain here. The real business background is totally different.

So, what's my problem? When the API controller returns the IDishes (in my case as Json), only the public properties of the IDish interface are written to the Json output.

Instead, I would like to have all the public properties of the concrete classes written to the Json output. So, for instance, if an IDish is a "Steak" I would like to have its ID, Name, CookingStyle and Weight written out. Accordingly just the ID and Name if it is a "Soup" and ID, Name and ContainsSugar if it is a "Dessert".

Is there an easy way to achieve this? Sometimes I tend to not see the trees before the woods...;-)

Thanks guys!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I needed pretty much the same functionality and I think there are 2 ways to go:

  1. Use the JSON.NET TypeNameHandling:

    var jsonFormatter = config.Formatters.JsonFormatter;
    var jsonSerializerSettings = new JsonSerializerSettings();
    jsonFormatter.SerializerSettings.TypeNameHandling = TypeNameHandling.All;

Explanation: https://github.com/ayoung/Newtonsoft.Json/blob/master/Newtonsoft.Json/TypeNameHandling.cs

  1. If you don't want your .NET types to be exposed in the JSON output there is another option.

Basically, what you need to do is: - create a class derived from JsonCreationConverter in which you override the Create method to manually select the type of the object you want to create - the you update the settings:

var jsonSerializerSettings = new JsonSerializerSettings();
jsonSerializerSettings.Converters.Add(new YourCustomJsonConverter());
jsonFormatter.SerializerSettings = jsonSerializerSettings;

Check out this article, it describes it step by step: http://dotnetbyexample.blogspot.co.uk/2012/02/json-deserialization-with-jsonnet-class.html

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Joanna, I would like to go with the easy approach first. Can you tell me where the "config." comes from? What type or object is that? Thanks for your help!!! –  Ingmar Bode Jan 17 '13 at 14:50
1  
@IngmarBode - the config is an HttpConfiguration object available as GlobalConfiguration.Configuration –  Joanna Turban Jan 17 '13 at 16:56
    
@Anna: Super! That was the missing piece. I put your first code snippet in my global.asax, and now everything is working like a charm. I do have lots of meta data in my Json result now, but I can totally live with that. The important thing is that I have all the properties of my concrete classes in the output now. Thank you very much, Joanna. This saved my day :-) –  Ingmar Bode Jan 17 '13 at 17:36
    
By the way, the new/extra metadata looks like this. Maybe I can easily turn this off as well? {"$type":"System.Collections.Generic.List`1[[myProject.Interfaces.IDish, myProject.Core]], mscorlib","$values":[{"$type":"myProject.Entities.Steak, ... –  Ingmar Bode Jan 17 '13 at 17:39
    
@IngmarBode - Nope, that's the point of typeNameHandling - json.net saves the type to be able to instantiate the correct object type during deserialization. However, you can try setting it to TypeNameHandling.Auto instead of TypeNameHandling.All, then json.net should store the type only for the types which differ from the base type. I'd check how that works for nested types though. –  Joanna Turban Jan 17 '13 at 19:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.