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I have a rather simple query that for some reason is not using any index:

CREATE TABLE `events_self` (
`id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`date` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
`username` varchar(16) CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_general_ci NOT NULL,
`event` enum('status_update','follow_hashtag','make_hashtag','avatar','placeholder_3') CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_general_ci NOT NULL,
`obj_id` varchar(140) CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_general_ci NOT NULL,
`inline` varchar(255) CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_general_ci NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`,`date`),
KEY `obj_id` (`obj_id`),
KEY `user_date` (`username`,`date`),
KEY `event` (`event`),
KEY `x` (`event`,`inline`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci;


INSERT INTO `events_self` (`id`, `date`, `username`, `event`, `obj_id`, `inline`) VALUES (1, 1358359266, 'aaa', 'make_hashtag', '1', 'scene');

SELECT inline FROM events_self  WHERE obj_id = 1;

EXPLAIN SELECT inline FROM events_self  WHERE obj_id = 1;


+----+-------------+-------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+---------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table       | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows    | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+---------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | events_self | ALL  | obj_id        | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 1610702 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+---------+-------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Server version: 5.3.2-MariaDB-beta-mariadb102~lenny-log (MariaDB - http://mariadb.com/)

Should I leave the table / query as is or it would be best to force the use of an index?

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Which is the question here? I don't see any question mark in your content –  Matei Mihai Jan 17 '13 at 11:32
    
It is probably because for your query, MySQL has considered that not using an index is the best way to proceed. Try and force it to use the index you think it should and compare the results. –  fge Jan 17 '13 at 11:33
1  
Since you have one single entry in you table, mysql estimated that it will take less resources to do a table scan that an index scan for your query. Don't forget that the query execution plan is taking into account the number of rows in the table. –  ioan Jan 17 '13 at 11:36
1  
@MateiMihai oops, i forgot to include my question. I've added it now on the question. –  sathia Jan 17 '13 at 11:36
    
@ioan on the production server it counts: ~1,426,959 rows and several thousands are added daily –  sathia Jan 17 '13 at 11:37
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

try this

EXPLAIN SELECT inline FROM events_self  WHERE obj_id = "1";

Since you sent the integer, MySql will not consider the indexing as type is different.

share|improve this answer
    
ouch, I've never seen such a thing. apparently it works correctly now. unfortunately obj_id must be a varchar(140). do you know where I can read about type issues with indexes on Mysql? thanks –  sathia Jan 17 '13 at 11:41
1  
you can modify your query to send the string instead of int. –  Venu Jan 17 '13 at 11:44
    
indeed: WHERE obj_id = 985591 LIMIT 1 => 1 row in set (0.66 sec) WHERE obj_id = "985591" LIMIT 1 => 1 row in set (0.00 sec) –  sathia Jan 17 '13 at 11:45
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