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I have this form : http://jsfiddle.net/dfJeN/

As you can see the name value for the input is statically set :

name="username"

, the form validation works fine (add something and remove all text from the input, a text must appears).

Then I try to dynamically set the name value : http://jsfiddle.net/jNWB8/

name="{input.name}"

Then I apply this to my validation

login.{{input.name}}.$error.required

(this pattern will be used in an ng-repeat) but my form validation is broken. It is correctly interpreted in my browser (if I inspect the element I saw login.username.$error.required).

Any Idea ?

EDIT: After logging the scope in the console it appears that the

{{input.name}}

expression is not interpolate. My form as an {{input.name}} attribute but no username.

UPDATE: Since 1.3.0-rc.3 name="{{input.name}}" works as expected. Please see #1404

share|improve this question
    
After some research I found this : "Once scenario in which the use of ngBind is prefered over {{ expression }} binding is when it's desirable to put bindings into template that is momentarily displayed by the browser in its raw state before Angular compiles it". In this page docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.directive:ngBind, it seems to be a good start for what I am trying to do. This post will be updated if I find a solution. – IxDay Jan 17 '13 at 13:15
    
There is an opened github issue github.com/angular/angular.js/issues/1404 – Yaroslav Apr 16 '13 at 6:22
    
Have any of the answers solved your problem. If so, please mark it as the answer by clicking on the ckeckmark bellow its score. – rcdmk Sep 30 '14 at 19:15
    
Here is a blog article that will likely be of some help to others who come across this issue: thebhwgroup.com/blog/2014/08/angularjs-html-form-design-part-2 – PFranchise Nov 3 '14 at 16:18

You can't do what you're trying to do that way.

Assuming what you're trying to do is you need to dynamically add elements to a form, with something like an ng-repeat, you need to use nested ng-form to allow validation of those individual items:

<form name="outerForm">
<div ng-repeat="item in items">
   <ng-form name="innerForm">
      <input type="text" name="foo" ng-model="item.foo" />
      <span ng-show="innerForm.foo.$error.required">required</span>
   </ng-form>
</div>
<input type="submit" ng-disabled="outerForm.$invalid" />
</form>

Sadly, it's just not a well-documented feature of Angular.

share|improve this answer
7  
I tried, and It works thanks a lot. – IxDay Jan 17 '13 at 16:46
8  
how did you end up solving this in the end? I still don't see how this particular answer relates to your problem - as it doesn't show dynamically generated form fields and names? – Oddman Jun 19 '13 at 22:40
5  
This is a complete solution (or workaround) and the suggested approach by the angular team (from docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.directive:form): "Since you cannot dynamically generate the name attribute of input elements using interpolation, you have to wrap each set of repeated inputs in an ngForm directive and nest these in an outer form element." Each nested form has its own scope which allows this to work. – Noremac Dec 5 '13 at 18:36
2  
This example and suggestion still don't address the dynamic "name". It looks like they want to allow you to nest dynamically 'cloned' sets of fields but the underlying name of each field must be static. – thinice Mar 20 '14 at 20:08
2  
@thinice Yes it does help. With this solution the name doesn't need to be dynamic. It can be anything you like (like "foo"). The point is the child form has it's own scope, so validation expressions can just refer to innerForm.foo.$error etc. The ng-model can then point to whatever you want it to in the parent scope (possibly dynamically). – WildService Jul 8 '14 at 18:19

Using nested ngForm allows you to access the specific InputController from within the HTML template. However, if you wish to access it from another controller it does not help.

e.g.

<script>
  function OuterController($scope) {
    $scope.inputName = 'dynamicName';

    $scope.doStuff = function() {
      console.log($scope.formName.dynamicName); // undefined
      console.log($scope.formName.staticName); // InputController
    }
  }
</script>

<div controller='OuterController'>
  <form name='myForm'>
    <input name='{{ inputName }}' />
    <input name='staticName' />
  </form>
  <a ng-click='doStuff()'>Click</a>
</div>

I use this directive to help solve the problem:

angular.module('test').directive('dynamicName', function($compile, $parse) {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    terminal: true,
    priority: 100000,
    link: function(scope, elem) {
      var name = $parse(elem.attr('dynamic-name'))(scope);
      // $interpolate() will support things like 'skill'+skill.id where parse will not
      elem.removeAttr('dynamic-name');
      elem.attr('name', name);
      $compile(elem)(scope);
    }
  };
});

Now you use dynamic names wherever is needed just the 'dynamic-name' attribute instead of the 'name' attribute.

e.g.

<script>
  function OuterController($scope) {
    $scope.inputName = 'dynamicName';

    $scope.doStuff = function() {
      console.log($scope.formName.dynamicName); // InputController
      console.log($scope.formName.staticName); // InputController
    }
  }
</script>

<div controller='OuterController'>
  <form name='myForm'>
    <input dynamic-name='inputName' />
    <input name='staticName' />
  </form>
  <a ng-click='doStuff()'>Click</a>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
That is terrific. Thank you! – Shaun Luttin Jan 31 '14 at 8:24
1  
Omg... The best piece of directive of the month... Your directive dynamicName is as mentioned "terrific"... So simple and so effective... – nembleton Apr 3 '14 at 3:47
    
This saved my butt. Thank you so much! – Kevin Beal Jul 23 '14 at 21:23
1  
I used this solution with the exception of using $interpolate instead of $parse, felt more useful – TheRocketSurgeon Dec 9 '14 at 5:33
    
i see you do termial:true. What does that mean? Can I use this directive on forms aswell, like <form ng-repeat="item in items" dynamic-name="'item'+item.id"> ... <span ng-show="item{{item.id}}.$invalid">This form is invalid</span></form> ? – felixfbecker Jul 3 '15 at 9:48

The problem should be fixed in AngularJS 1.3, according to this discussion on Github.

Meanwhile, here's a temporary solution created by @caitp and @Thinkscape:

// Workaround for bug #1404
// https://github.com/angular/angular.js/issues/1404
// Source: http://plnkr.co/edit/hSMzWC?p=preview
app.config(['$provide', function($provide) {
    $provide.decorator('ngModelDirective', function($delegate) {
        var ngModel = $delegate[0], controller = ngModel.controller;
        ngModel.controller = ['$scope', '$element', '$attrs', '$injector', function(scope, element, attrs, $injector) {
            var $interpolate = $injector.get('$interpolate');
            attrs.$set('name', $interpolate(attrs.name || '')(scope));
            $injector.invoke(controller, this, {
                '$scope': scope,
                '$element': element,
                '$attrs': attrs
            });
        }];
        return $delegate;
    });
    $provide.decorator('formDirective', function($delegate) {
        var form = $delegate[0], controller = form.controller;
        form.controller = ['$scope', '$element', '$attrs', '$injector', function(scope, element, attrs, $injector) {
            var $interpolate = $injector.get('$interpolate');
            attrs.$set('name', $interpolate(attrs.name || attrs.ngForm || '')(scope));
            $injector.invoke(controller, this, {
                '$scope': scope,
                '$element': element,
                '$attrs': attrs
            });
        }];
        return $delegate;
    });
}]);

Demo on JSFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
For those stuck on ng 1.2, this is easily the least 'hacky' fix. – grenade Mar 2 '15 at 16:46
    
Yep, worked for me as well. – mms27 Jun 18 '15 at 21:55

Nice one by @EnISeeK.... but i got it to be more elegant and less obtrusive to other directives:

.directive("dynamicName",[function(){
    return {
        restrict:"A",
        require: ['ngModel', '^form'],
        link:function(scope,element,attrs,ctrls){
            ctrls[0].$name = scope.$eval(attrs.dynamicName) || attrs.dynamicName;
            ctrls[1].$addControl(ctrls[0]);
        }
    };
}])
share|improve this answer
    
I would only add following. ctrls[0].$name = scope.$eval(attrs.dynamicName) || attrs.dynamicName; – GnrlBzik Aug 26 '14 at 19:30
    
Very nice addition... will use this from now on. Cheers man. – srfrnk Aug 27 '14 at 20:39
    
awesome. Of the solutions I found this to be the least intrusive while still accomplishing the task. Thanks! – ragamufin Nov 22 '14 at 15:20

Just a little improvement over EnlSeek solution

angular.module('test').directive('dynamicName', ["$parse", function($parse) {
 return {
    restrict: 'A',
    priority: 10000, 
    controller : ["$scope", "$element", "$attrs", 
           function($scope, $element, $attrs){
         var name = $parse($attrs.dynamicName)($scope);
         delete($attrs['dynamicName']);
         $element.removeAttr('data-dynamic-name');
         $element.removeAttr('dynamic-name');
          $attrs.$set("name", name);
    }]

  };
}]);

Here is a plunker trial. Here is detailed explantion

share|improve this answer
    
+1, EnlSeek's directive was causing an infinite loop in my directive; I had to remove the 'fx' pieces of this answer to get it to work, though – John Feb 25 '14 at 17:15
    
Corrected the error pointed by John – jason zhang Feb 25 '14 at 18:52
    
The priority can interfere with a set of fields that would assume the same name but have ng-if. e.g.: <input type='text' dynamic-name='foo' ng-if='field.type == "text" /> <textarea dynamic-name='foo' ng-if='field.type == "textarea"></textarea> Removing the 'priority: 10000' solved the problem for me and still appears to function correctly. – thinice Mar 20 '14 at 20:16
    
ngIf has priority 600. Assign a priority less than 600 for this directive should make it work together with ngIf. – jason zhang Mar 20 '14 at 22:53
    
If no priority is set(default to 0), it may work with ngModel (priority 0) if this directive is evaluated before ngModel. You want to give it a priority so that it is always before ngModel is compiled/linked. – jason zhang Mar 20 '14 at 22:55

I expand the @caitp and @Thinkscape solution a bit, to allow dynamically created nested ng-forms, like this:

<div ng-controller="ctrl">
    <ng-form name="form">
        <input type="text" ng-model="static" name="static"/>

        <div ng-repeat="df in dynamicForms">
            <ng-form name="form{{df.id}}">
                <input type="text" ng-model="df.sub" name="sub"/>
                <div>Dirty: <span ng-bind="form{{df.id}}.$dirty"></span></div>
            </ng-form>
        </div>

        <div><button ng-click="consoleLog()">Console Log</button></div>
        <div>Dirty: <span ng-bind="form.$dirty"></span></div>
    </ng-form>      
</div>

Here is my demo on JSFiddle.

share|improve this answer

I used Ben Lesh's solution and it works well for me. But one problem I faced was that when I added an inner form using ng-form, all of the form states e.g. form.$valid, form.$error etc became undefined if I was using the ng-submit directive.

So if I had this for example:

<form novalidate ng-submit="saveRecord()" name="outerForm">
    <!--parts of the outer form-->
    <ng-form name="inner-form">
      <input name="someInput">
    </ng-form>
    <button type="submit">Submit</button>
</form>

And in the my controller:

$scope.saveRecord = function() {
    outerForm.$valid // this is undefined
}

So I had to go back to using a regular click event for submitting the form in which case it's necessary to pass the form object:

<form novalidate name="outerForm">  <!--remove the ng-submit directive-->
    <!--parts of the outer form-->
    <ng-form name="inner-form">
      <input name="someInput">
    </ng-form>
    <button type="submit" ng-click="saveRecord(outerForm)">Submit</button>
</form>

And the revised controller method:

$scope.saveRecord = function(outerForm) {
    outerForm.$valid // this works
}

I'm not quite sure why this is but hopefully it helps someone.

share|improve this answer

Allow me to suggest a wild option:

<input name="someInput" id="someInput">

If your project has jQuery library dependency then in your controller:

function OuterController($scope) {

    $scope.inputName = 'dynamicName';

    $scope.setDynamicName= function() {
        $("#someInput").attr('name', $scope.inputName);
        $("#someInput").attr('id', $scope.inputName);
    }

}
share|improve this answer

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