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I have isolated the following code and it works inside the OnNavigatedTo event, so I know the code works. BUT, I can't use it there. I need to use it inside the Suspending event. But it won't work there. And when I set breakpoints, they're not being hit anywhere inside this event. There are no compiletime or runtime errors either.

What is going on?

async void App_Suspending(
        Object sender,
        Windows.ApplicationModel.SuspendingEventArgs e)
        {
            IReadOnlyList<StorageFile> thefiles;

            var localFolder = Windows.Storage.ApplicationData.Current.LocalFolder;
            Windows.Globalization.DateTimeFormatting.DateTimeFormatter formatter = new Windows.Globalization.DateTimeFormatting.DateTimeFormatter("longtime");
            thefiles = await localFolder.GetFilesAsync();

            foreach (var f in thefiles)
            {
                await f.DeleteAsync(StorageDeleteOption.Default);
            }
        }
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Why exactly are you putting an await within an already async method? –  Ramhound Jan 17 '13 at 12:40
    
Because that's what you're supposed to do, unless it is different for the Suspending event, which isn't noted anywhere in the docs that I have seen. –  Tommy Jan 17 '13 at 13:15
    
Why are you not using a SuspendingDeferral? Furthermore why is it App_Suspending instead of OnSuspending –  Ramhound Jan 17 '13 at 13:58
    
Have you also noticed that Microsoft has yet ANOTHER method you can use? It's called "SaveState" and LoadState, and is included in the default page templates in visual studio. Now, as to why I am using App_Suspending; because it works, and I've been reading the docs a lot lately and most of the samples I've come across, especially when learning about Suspending apps, have used that. –  Tommy Jan 17 '13 at 14:13
2  
Don't forget to request a deferral when using async and suspending. private async void OnSuspending(object sender, SuspendingEventArgs e) { var deferral = e.SuspendingOperation.GetDeferral(); //TODO: Delete Files or any async operation deferral.Complete(); } msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/hh986968.aspx –  kindasimple Jan 17 '13 at 15:32
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2 Answers

My guess is that when you await in this method the app exits the Suspending method and in this way gives the OS permission to kill the process. You can test this by putting a breakpoint after the first await (on the foreach) and checking if it is ever reached.

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When I remove the await I get a warning: Warning 1 Because this call is not awaited, execution of the current method continues before the call is completed. Consider applying the 'await' operator to the result of the call. But I still tried it without the await and I am still having the same issue. –  Tommy Jan 17 '13 at 13:19
    
Breakpoints are never reached anywhere in this method. –  Tommy Jan 17 '13 at 13:20
    
It is strange that breakpoints are not reached anywhere in the method. Breakpoints before await should be reached. Keep in mind that it takes about 10-15 seconds after closing the app for the Suspend method to get called. Maybe you did not wait for it. –  Stilgar Jan 17 '13 at 13:26
    
Yeah, I definitely waited. 'Cause I specifically remember thinking (several times) "Oh damn it, how much longer????!!!!" –  Tommy Jan 17 '13 at 13:30
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have found my solution. It involved checking whether or not the app was closed by the user. If so, it is (in my case, anyway) OK to delete these temporary files. You can do this in the App.xaml.cs file inside the OnLaunched method:

if (args.PreviousExecutionState == ApplicationExecutionState.ClosedByUser)
            {

                IReadOnlyList<StorageFile> thefiles;

                var localFolder = Windows.Storage.ApplicationData.Current.LocalFolder;
                Windows.Globalization.DateTimeFormatting.DateTimeFormatter formatter = new Windows.Globalization.DateTimeFormatting.DateTimeFormatter("longtime");
                thefiles = await localFolder.GetFilesAsync();

                foreach (var f in thefiles)
                {
                    await f.DeleteAsync(StorageDeleteOption.Default);
                }
            }
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