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Below are 3 functions. main() prints out as expected. Now, in mycharstack() the string is stored on stack I guess, so as "ch" goes out of scope, it should not be able to return the string. How does it work correctly? I guess the string stored in mychar() is also on stack. Is it supposed to work correctly? I guess there are other errors in the code and memory leaks, please let me know if any. I could do these cleaner & easier with std::string. But I want to understand what's going on with char*.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

char* mychar()
{
    return "Hello";
}

char* mycharstack()
{
    char* ch = "Hello Stack";
    return ch;
}

char* mycharheap()
{
    char* ch = new char;
    ch = "Hello Heap";
    return ch;
}

int main()
{
    cout << "mychar() = " << mychar() << endl;
    cout << "mycharstack() = " << mycharstack() << endl;
    cout << "mycharheap() = " << mycharheap() << endl;

    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In C++, the string handling is different from, for example, pascal.

char* mycharheap()
{
    char* ch = new char;
    ch = "Hello Heap";
    return ch;
}

This does following:

  1. char* ch = new char; creates memory for ONE character, and assigns it to variable ch
  2. ch = "Hello Heap"; assigns to variable ch pointer to readonly memory, which contains bytes "Hello Heap\0". Also, the original content of variable ch is lost, resulting in memory leak.
  3. return ch; returns the pointer stored to variable ch.

What you probably wanted is

char* mycharheap()
{
    char* ch = new char[11] /* 11 = len of Hello Heap + 1 char for \0*/;
    strcpy(ch, "Hello Heap");
    return ch;
}

Note the strcpy -> you've got memory in ch, that has space for 11 chars, and you are filling it by string from read-only portion of memory.

There will be a leak in this case. You will need to delete the memory after writing, like:

char* tempFromHeap = mycharheap();
cout << "mycharheap() = " << tempFromHeap << endl;
delete[] tempFromHeap;

However, I highly don't recommend doing this (allocating memory in callee and deleting in caller). For this situations, there are, for example, STL std::string, another common and more reasonable approach is allocating in caller, passing to callee, which 'fills' the memory with result, and deallocating in caller again.

What will result in undefined behavior is following:

char* mycharstack()
{
    char[] ch = "Hello Heap"; /* this is a shortcut for char[11] ch; ch[0] = 'H', ch[1] = 'e', ...... */
    return ch;
}

This will create array on stack with bytes "Hello Heap\0", and then tries to return pointer to first byte of that array (which can, in calling function, point to anything)

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If I just replaced mycharheap() with the one you mentioned in my code, there would still be leak...right? In main() no ones freeing the allocated memory. –  ontherocks Jan 17 '13 at 13:07
    
Yes. See my updated answer. –  Yossarian Jan 17 '13 at 13:17
    
So for functions like mycharheap(), its not recommend to use it directly as a parameter in other functions that take char* as a input parameter. For example say there is a function print(char* char_in); I should not do something like print(mycharheap());. That would lead to memory leak. Am I right? –  ontherocks Jan 17 '13 at 13:22
    
@ontherocks, exactly. you can create function print_and_then_delete(), but, again, this is not a very good idea from design perspective. –  Yossarian Jan 17 '13 at 17:31
    
say if the print function looks like this print(char* char_in) { cout << char_in << endl; }, how would the print_and_then_delete(char* char_in) function look like? Please give an example code. –  ontherocks Jan 18 '13 at 12:28

First off, if you're using C++, use std::string to represent strings.

Now to your question. char* is a pointer to char (or array of chars). String literals (stuff in quotes) are read-only objects of type array of char, stored in some sort of read-only memory (neither on stack or heap).

As char* is a pointer, assigning into it changes the pointer. So mychar() and mycharstack() both return a pointer to a string literal stored in read-only memory.

mycharheap() simply leaks. You allocate one char on the heap using new char, and then forget its address and return a pointer to a string literal instead. I guess you meant this:

char* mycharheap() {
  char* ch = new char[strlen("Hello Heap") + 1];
  strcpy(ch, "Hello Heap");
  return ch;
}

Nevertheless, to re-iterate, don't use char* for strings in C++. Use std::string.

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There are no errors in your code just a leaked char. But it is pretty weird.

char* mycharheap()
{
    char* ch = new char; //creates a pointer that points to a new char in the heap
    ch = "Hello Heap";   //overwrites the pointer with const char - but this cast is legal.
                         //note: pointer to the previous char is lost
    return ch;           //return the pointer to the constant area where "Hello heap" is stored.
                         //no, "Hello heap" is not on the heap.
}

For the "What you want:" part, Yossarian was faster than me.

share|improve this answer
    
So this code which also works without any errors is also similar if not identical char* mycharheap() { char* ch = new char[]; ch = "Hello Heap"; return ch; } –  ontherocks Jan 17 '13 at 12:52
    
Yes. Almost indentical and they have the same issue - "Hello Heap" is no on the heap. Look at @Yossarian's answer to see how to implement what you wanted. –  Csq Jan 17 '13 at 14:09

in mycharstack() the string is stored on stack I guess, so as "ch" goes out of scope, it should not be able to return the string. How does it work correctly?

A string literal refers to an array that lives in static memory. I hope you are aware of the three memory areas: automatic memory (aka stack), free store (aka heap) and static memory. That thing on the stack is just a pointer variable and you return the value of the pointer (the address it stores) by value. So everything is fine except for the fact that you should have used const char* as pointer type because you are not allowed to modify the array a string literal refers to.

I guess the string stored in mychar() is also on stack.

The string (the character array) is stored in static memory. char* is just a pointer type you can use to pass addresses around. const is also missing.

I guess there are other errors in the code and memory leaks, please let me know if any.

The leak is in your third function. You allocate memory for just one character on the heap and store its address into the variable called ch. With the following assignment you overwrite this address with the address of a string literal. So, you're leaking memory.

You seem to be thinking of char* as type for string variables. But it is not. It's the type for a pointer to a character or character sequence. The pointer and the string it might point to are two seperate things. What you probably should be using here is std::string instead.

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Function mycharheap() is leaking: you make your pointer point to a memory region of the length of one char allocated on the heap, and then you modify that pointer to point to a string literal which is stored in read-only memory. The allocated memory will not be freed.

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How do I free the allocated memory? I mean, where do I call delete in the above code? –  ontherocks Jan 17 '13 at 12:44
    
@ontherocks: this question is wrong ;-) you should not reassign the pointer in the first place. if you want to allocate the string "hello world" on the heap, then allocate a buffer of sufficient length (new char[size]) and then copy the string into that buffer. once you return the pointer to the caller, it's the caller's responsibility to delete it (by assigning the result to a char* pointer and calling delete on that pointer after –  Andy Prowl Jan 17 '13 at 12:47
    
So in the above code there is no way to free up the allocated memory? –  ontherocks Jan 17 '13 at 12:55
    
@ontherocks: like what? –  Andy Prowl Jan 17 '13 at 12:56

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