Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does int a[x,y] convert into a[y], since comma operator operates left to right? I would expect a[(x,y)], since inner operation will finish first. But in the first one it is supposed to take the first argument.

I'm not planning to use the comma operator for array initialization, just asking why this happens.

I read it in a book, and I'm confused.

Update:

Wikipedia says:

 i = a, b, c;            // stores a into i 
 i = (a, b, c);          // stores c into i   

So as first line of code says in the array the first value must be assigned to the array. Note: I'm not actually planning to use this. I'm just asking. I'm learning C++ and I read in a book that in an array declaration a[y,x]; so it should be a[y], x; not a[x]. Why does the compiler do this?

share|improve this question
    
Probably a[x][y] is what you want to do. –  yattering Jan 17 '13 at 13:03
1  
What are you trying to do? Can you please give some context or at least some more code? –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 17 '13 at 13:05
    
I would certainly be interested why this was downvoted. Seems like a perfectly valid question to me. –  Angew Jan 17 '13 at 13:13
    
int a[x, y] will not compile. Variable-length arrays are not legal C++ so you can only have a constant expression there. You probably meant int a[10]; a[x, y]; or something similar. –  Fiktik Jan 17 '13 at 13:23
    
No way. I hadnt notice the down vote. Im bad luck brian here. –  Jhonnytunes Jan 17 '13 at 14:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The comma operator , is also known as the "forget" operator. It does the following:

  1. Completely evaluate the left operand
  2. Forget its value
  3. Completely evaluate the right operand
  4. Use value of right operand as value of entire operator expression.

So in your case, it behaves just as it should. a[x, y] first evaluates x, then discards its value, then uses the value of y as the value of the entire expression (the one in brackets).

EDIT

Regarding your edit with Wikipedia. Note that the precedence of , is less than that of =. In other words,

i = a, b, c;

is interpreted as

(i = a), b, c;

That's why a is copied into i. However, the result of the entire expression will still be c.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok but how do you explain this: i = a += 2, a + b; Since (=) and (+=) has the same level of precedence. Well = is on top of += and still += is called first. –  Jhonnytunes Jan 17 '13 at 15:26
1  
@Jhonnytunes Assignments associate right-to-left. Your expression is parsed as (i = (a += 2)), (a + b). –  Angew Jan 17 '13 at 15:30
    
With your edit now I understand. This "(i = a), b, c;" makes me think again because I think the = sign as a operator waiting for the comma operator to evaluate everything. Now its clear, thanks. –  Jhonnytunes Jan 17 '13 at 16:46
    
@Jhonnytunes just an extra FYI: the comma has the lowest precedence of all operators –  mikemxm Jan 17 '13 at 17:11

I believe that your compiler is assuming that you meant to add parentheses. In C++ there's a comma operator and a comma separator. The comma operator must itself and its operands be enclosed in parentheses. The int array constructor only expects one value, so I'm guessing that your compiler is trying to help you out.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zs06xbxh(v=vs.80).aspx

EDIT: int a[x,y] is not valid; int a[(x,y)] is valid; his compiler is assuming he meant to add parentheses. In a more general context the comma operator doesn't require parentheses. In function calls and initializers parentheses are required to distinguish between using a comma operator and a comma separator.

share|improve this answer
    
The comma operator does not, on its own, require parentheses. –  Pete Becker Jan 17 '13 at 13:34
    
MSDN disagrees with you: "Where the comma is normally used as a separator (for example in actual arguments to functions or aggregate initializers), the comma operator and its operands must be enclosed in parentheses." –  mikemxm Jan 17 '13 at 14:01
    
    
int a[x,y] is not valid; int a[(x,y)] is valid; his compiler is assuming he meant to add parentheses. If you mean, in a more general context, that the comma operator doesn't require parentheses then I agree. In function calls and initializers parentheses are required to distinguish between using a comma operator and a comma separator. –  mikemxm Jan 17 '13 at 14:12
    
@mikemxm but this still doesn't fit OP's situation - "where comma is normally used as a separator" does not apply here since, as you point out, int a[x, y] is not valid. –  Fiktik Jan 17 '13 at 14:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.