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I was discussing with a colleague about JavaScript while looking at some snippets. We noticed that these snippets were missing the ; at the end of the statements. We all know that JS is interpreted correctly even if no semicolon is shown at the end of a line, but I was wondering if this affects somehow the performance of evaluation, since it is an interpreted language.

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16  
Even if it does, it won't be something you'll conceivably notice. Worry more about dust clogging your CPU fan. –  Zirak Jan 17 '13 at 13:15
    
You could just not leave it out and then not have to worry. –  George Jan 17 '13 at 13:17
1  
So you are asking whether parsing JavaScript without semicolons is faster or slower? I think that really depends on the actual source code, i.e. which possible states the parser could go into if a semicolon is there or not and how it can recover from that. Once the code is parsed it does not matter anymore anyways. So all you could do with this is improving the "startup time" for the code and that probably has no effect on the overall performance of a page. –  Felix Kling Jan 17 '13 at 13:25
    
Generic answer for these kind of questions: you'd have to benchmark different code in a bunch of browsers, there's no guarantee that it won't change in the future and performance difference is most likely irrelevant. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Jan 17 '13 at 13:25
    
Apparently, if you use about a thousand semicolons, it has a huge impact: jsperf.com/testing-semicolons-against-no-semicolons –  The Wobbuffet Jan 13 at 0:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A javascript file with spaces, semi-colons and comments is heavier. That's the main impact.

But you're a coder and you have to maintain the code, so this very slight impact is much less important than the adverse one on readability. And omitting the semicolons means you know when you can omit them. But the rules aren't so simple and learning them isn't worth your time.

Leave the semi-colons where they are, you'll avoid bugs.

And use a minifier (for example the Closure compiler) to build a more concise code for the browser if you really really want to have the lightest possible code. It's its duty, not yours.

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+1 for a sensible answer. micro optimizations like this are pointless - unless for style purposes I think this question is moot. –  rlemon Jan 17 '13 at 13:25

Omitting semicolons in JS is big debate, but we should always keep semicolon. If you talk about performance, then there will be very little benefit while keeping semicolon.

But the things not end up here only. Other than performance there is one big thing which needs to be take care.
Doug Crockford explains the need of semicolons very well in this presentation.

The JS Interpreter finds an error, adds a semicolon, and runs the whole thing again.<br> But not every time he puts the semicolon on the right place and hillarous bugs are the consequence.<br> You should always make semicolons and run your js through testing tools like JSLint.

Other than this Semicolons give the code more structure and make it cleaner - additionally, their presence allows some developers to obfuscate their code.

Hope it will help you.

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Tiny differences in code syntax usually have very little effect on the performance of the code. the process of interpreting a string of code is very efficient and takes a tiny fraction of the time taken by actually running the code.

An inefficient algorithm or an extra network call, such as pulling in multiple .js files instead of a single one have far greater impact.

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