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I have a condition to check say delete and article if user is owner.

delete_article if user.owner?

Another way is

user.owner? && delete_article

is there any benefit in choosing either of it or is it just a writing style

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10  
first is clearer in terms of intentions –  apneadiving Jan 17 '13 at 13:30
    
Write a benchmark and figure it out yourself. It's easy enough to do. –  the Tin Man Jan 17 '13 at 15:01
    
Performance benifits such as this (if any) will not be significant for a web app (network/IO latency will dwarf any gains). Therefore I would aim for style, personally I prefer if over && in this case. –  Kris Jan 17 '13 at 15:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's some code to test the speed of if vs. &&.

require 'benchmark'

n = 10_000_000

puts RUBY_VERSION, n
puts

Benchmark.bm(2) do |b|
  10.times do
    b.report('if') { n.times { true if true } }
    b.report('&&') { n.times { true && true } }
  end
end

And the output:

1.9.3
10000000

        user     system      total        real
if   0.970000   0.000000   0.970000 (  0.975714)
&&   1.130000   0.000000   1.130000 (  1.127514)
if   0.950000   0.000000   0.950000 (  0.956892)
&&   1.120000   0.000000   1.120000 (  1.124547)
if   0.970000   0.000000   0.970000 (  0.962618)
&&   1.120000   0.000000   1.120000 (  1.129094)
if   0.960000   0.000000   0.960000 (  0.954498)
&&   1.120000   0.000000   1.120000 (  1.125080)
if   0.960000   0.000000   0.960000 (  0.954001)
&&   1.120000   0.000000   1.120000 (  1.126329)
if   0.950000   0.000000   0.950000 (  0.953360)
&&   1.130000   0.000000   1.130000 (  1.122664)
if   0.950000   0.000000   0.950000 (  0.951391)
&&   1.120000   0.010000   1.130000 (  1.123455)
if   0.980000   0.000000   0.980000 (  0.977263)
&&   1.120000   0.000000   1.120000 (  1.126989)
if   0.970000   0.000000   0.970000 (  0.966264)
&&   1.120000   0.000000   1.120000 (  1.123184)
if   0.960000   0.000000   0.960000 (  0.956702)
&&   1.120000   0.000000   1.120000 (  1.124589)
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ohh I see If is better(though negligible) –  Ross Jan 18 '13 at 4:53
    
It's negligible in a one line program, but, scaled out into a full-featured program doing a lot of conditionals inside loops it could add up to minutes or longer. The benefit to benchmarks is we can learn efficient ways to do things, do them consistently, and eke out the best performance from what many perceive as a "slow" language. –  the Tin Man Jan 20 '13 at 22:36

Performance is unlikely going to be an issue with that statement.

The first one is much better - it's easier to read. Your future self and others who'll get to work on the code will thank you for it.

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See the benchmark about the difference in speed. –  the Tin Man Jan 17 '13 at 15:11
    
Yep - not an issue –  marcel salathe Jan 20 '13 at 22:21

You can use both styles but there are some differences in the logic.

Used in a method call:

def something
  delete_article if user.owner?
end

would return whatever the the method delete_article returns or nil if the user is not the owner.

With:

def something
  user.owner? && delete_article
end

it would return false if the user is not an owner. If the user is an owner it would return whatever the method delete_article returns.

Performance should be about the same.

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In either case, the returned value would evaluate as a "false" because nil and false are equivalent for "truthiness". –  the Tin Man Jan 25 '13 at 15:15
    
True, but you have to be aware what kind of value you expect... maybe you have something like result.nil?. In case of false as return value it would evaluate to false. –  spas Jan 28 '13 at 16:17

I believe both styles of writing this will have the same performance. Always prefer the first version as it is easier to read and although considered "hacky" and "hard-core" the second version actually is no optimization.

EDIT: Here is how to do some benchmarking. It seems both versions really perform similarly:

limit = 10**7
time_val=Time.now;sum=0;(0..limit).each{|t| even?(t) && sum += t};puts Time.now - time_val

time_val=Time.now;sum=0;(0..limit).each{|t| sum += t if even?(t)};puts Time.now - time_val
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Use Ruby's built-in Benchmark. It's easy to set up and offers decent ways to format the output. –  the Tin Man Jan 18 '13 at 4:58

They should have the same performance as they do the same thing, or at least negligible difference in performance.

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You are wrong. true && 1 #=> 1 –  Ismael Abreu Jan 17 '13 at 13:41
2  
They return different results just when the first is not truth 1 if false #=> nil and false && 1 #=> false –  Ismael Abreu Jan 17 '13 at 13:43
    
Hmm actually yeah, my bad. That's weird –  John H Jan 17 '13 at 13:44

In terms of performance, if is better, as the Tin Man shows. But sometimes, you need to write using && or and if you want to make it a one-liner, as in the case when the main part includes a non-instance variable that is to be defined in the condition:

do_something_with(foo) if foo = something_that_comes_from_condition

will return an error, but

(foo = something_that_comes_from_condition) && do_something_with(foo)

or

foo = something_that_comes_from_condition and do_something_with(foo)

does not have such problem.

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