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I have a section of the web page I am building that is dedicated to news events. These are simply entered as follows currently.

<tr>
<td class="newsdate">
    February 2013
</td>
<td class="news">
    News item 1
</td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td class="newsdate">
        January 2013
</td>
<td class="news">
        News items 2
</td>
</tr>

I would like to have it so that when there are more than 5 events listed, say, then you can use a scroll bar to see old events. That is the height of the news section will be fixed but you can scroll up and down within it to see newer and older news. How can you do this most simply?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Wrap your table in a div using overflow-y: auto; like this

HTML

<div class="scrollable">
    <!-- Your table -->
</div>

CSS

.scrollable {
    height: 100px; /* or any value */
    overflow-y: auto;
}
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Thanks very much. –  lip1 Jan 17 '13 at 13:55

Use CSS:

.scrollbar {
  height: 100px;
  overflow: auto; // here is the magic :)
}
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If your news events are wrapped in a <table id="news">, then your CSS would look like this:

#news {
    height: 200px;
    overflow-y: auto;
}
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Place your table inside a DIV element and specify a height, like this:

<div style="height:400px;overflow:auto">
   <table>....</table>
</div>

It will be automatically scrolled if needed

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1  
I can't recommend using the style attribute –  Jan Dvorak Jan 17 '13 at 13:50
1  
I believe we should avoid using inline CSS in our HTML code as much as posible. –  Hieu Le Jan 17 '13 at 13:51
    
I think using inline style attributes are fine in certain cases. If this is a unique style, it makes the HTML easier to read by keeping it attached to the <div> tag. The alternative is to create an arbitrary class name and define it in a <style> section or in an ever-growing .css file; both require hunting it down to make changes. On the other hand, if this style is used anywhere else then the DRY principle (Don't Repeat Yourself) applies and you should use a class name. –  Brent Washburne Jan 31 '14 at 18:15

HTML example markup:

  <ul id="container">
    <li>Article 1</li>
    <li>Article 2</li>
    <li>Article 3</li>
    <li>Article 4</li>
    <li>Article 5</li>
    <li>Article 6</li>
    <li>Article 7</li>
    <li>Article 8</li>
  </ul>

and CSS:

ul#container {
    height: 100px; 
    overflow-y: auto;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/UvsrY/4/

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