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If I have a struct in C

typedef struct _a {
    int aval;
} a;

a a_inst;

void main() {
    a_inst.aval = 5;
}

how can I access "aval" without having to type as a_inst.aval for this example ?? Is this possible ?

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You could use a #define, but what is the use case? Just lack of code completion and less to type? –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 17 '13 at 14:01
    
If you don't want to have to type the a_inst. part, don't put it in a struct. But structs are for collecting related things together so they can be referred to as a single thing, so once you've created one, you have to indicate which one you want to refer to. If you have two instances of the a struct, and you just typed aval, how would the program know which instance you meant? –  prprcupofcoffee Jan 17 '13 at 14:02
    
a a_inst = { 5 }; –  hmjd Jan 17 '13 at 14:02
    
Note that some languages allow you to use shorthand, e.g. Pascal lets you say with a_inst and then use the field names of a_inst without qualification. But C does not have anything like this. –  Paul R Jan 17 '13 at 14:03
    
I am trying to convert fortran code to C. In fortran you have a keyword called use. Once you say use [module], you can access the modules variables. I want to try doing this but pack the module's variables into a struct. –  madan kandula Jan 17 '13 at 14:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

a_inst.aval refers to "the aval part of the structure a_inst".

aval - as you want to type - would refer to "aval...?", at which point the compiler will become grumpy and refuse to cooperate.

Answer to your question: No.

(Unless, of course, you start wiggling about with #define / typedef / pointers as a means of shorthand notation, at which point you are crossing into dangerous waters of making your code less readable.)

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Apart from #define or using a pointer, no. So you could do

#define AVAL a_inst.aval

or

int * pAval= a_inst.aval

But experienced programmers will not do this.

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(Actually I can come up with a few odd cases where such macros make sense. For example, I often write code fetching a number of functions from a DLL in runtime. The functions are obtained through function pointers. To do this quickly and properly in a loop, I put all function pointers inside a union, where they can be accessed individually by name, or through an array. The code fetching the function pointers from the DLL uses the array notation, but the rest of the program wants to call them as if they were normal functions. Instead of typing my_union.func(), I #define func my_union.func.) –  Lundin Jan 17 '13 at 16:13

One possible way is to use a pointer on this structure field. But you will need

void main() {
  int *p_aval = &a_inst.aval;
  *p_aval=...; //access
}

personnally I will prefer to type the structure name. It is explicit, doesn't harm (like few more characters to type) and is less prone to bugs.

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Since the structure is composed by only one int you can set aval in this way:

*((int *) &a_inst) = 5;
printf("AVAL %d\n", a_inst.aval);

result:

AVAL 5

but i reccomend to NOT USE this kind of structure access

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Just presenting this as a simple, easy to understand example.

I am assuming you want to be able to do this:

typedef struct _a {
    int aval;
} a;

a a_inst;

void main() {
    aval = 5; // <-- Access aval without typing a_inst.aval
}

However, that is in no reasonable way possible.

Why?

Because what if you have:

typedef struct _a {
    int aval;
} a;

a a_inst;
a b_inst;  // Another instance of the a struct

void main() {
    aval = 5; // <-- How would the compiler know if aval refers to aval in a_inst or in b_inst?
}
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