Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have blocks performing calculations using a function step(). The blocks can be connected to each other with connect(Block).

interface Block {
    void connect(Block b);
    void step();
}

However from within a concrete block implementation (e.g. in step) it should be possible to read from the connected block:

class ABlockImpl implements Block {
    private Block src; // link to the block this block is connected to
    public void connect(Block b) {
        src = b;
    }

    public void step() {
        double x = src.read(); // XXX src is of type Block and there is no read() in Block
        /* ... */
    }

    public double read() {
        return 3.14;
    }
}

Since there is no read() in Block, this won't compile. For clients the "public" Block interface is sufficient, I need read only internally. I could add read to the Block interface, but to me this feels wrong.

Since there are multiple different implementations of Block, I cannot cast src to ABlockImpl before the call to read.

Is there an alternative way to "hide" read?

share|improve this question
    
Please rephrase the title and question, it is misleading and I had to read it 3 times to get what you mean. –  Sentry Jan 17 '13 at 14:47
    
Do you have a suggestion, I was thinking mostly about how to phrase it. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 17 '13 at 14:55
    
It sounds like you just want one class to implement two different interfaces, but I think you want an interface that is not public, am I right? –  Sentry Jan 17 '13 at 14:59
    
I am not sure. I think I want a public interface without read and a way for blocks to still read from each other. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 17 '13 at 15:07
2  
I dont think you can or want to do this with an interface. Clients can provide their own implementations of Block, therefore read() has to be part of the interface. It sounds as if you want to provide all implementations yourself. I would therefore propose you publish an abstract class with a private read() or something. –  jmaschad Jan 17 '13 at 15:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can have a public interface and a package local one

public interface MyPublicInterface {

}

interface MyDirectInterface extends MyPublicInterface {

}

class MyImpl implements MyDirectInterface {

    public void add(MyPublicInterface mpi) {
         MyDirectInterface mdi = (MyDirectInterface) mpi;
         // use mdi
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
When I change the type of src to MyDirectInterface I can no longer assign src in connect(Block), since the caller gives me a public interface instance. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 17 '13 at 15:05
1  
You have to cast the public interface to the private one on the assumption that all implementations of the public interface implement the private one. I have added an example. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 17 '13 at 15:20
    
In this case I would rather add read to the interface, do you agree? –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 17 '13 at 15:54
    
You could document that the method is for internal use, if believe the developers will read it. You could give it a surprising name like $read or read$ –  Peter Lawrey Jan 17 '13 at 16:24
1  
@PeterLawrey Yes, but if the class needs to be public, your solution wouldn't work anymore. I mean, it's better than what I came up with so far, but I think this should be pointed out. –  Sentry Jan 18 '13 at 12:22

You could create abstract layer between interface and concrete implementations of block and name it, for example, BlockAdapter.

I.e.:

interface Block {
    void connect(Block b);
    void step();
    double read();
}

...

public abstract class BlockAdapter implements Block { 
    double read() {
          return -1; // ? something like that
    }
}

...

public class ABlockImpl extends BlockAdapter { ... }
share|improve this answer
    
I thought the idea was to not have read() in the interface? –  jmaschad Jan 17 '13 at 14:57
    
@JohannesSchad I think, that author possibly doesn't want it because in common case he must add this method implementation to all subclasses. Adapter pattern allows do it in only one layer and override this method in only desired subclasses. –  Andremoniy Jan 17 '13 at 14:59
    
No, I don't want to have read in the interface (if that is possible). –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 17 '13 at 15:06
    
Why don't you remove read from the interface, but define it protected in the abstract class? –  Sentry Jan 18 '13 at 9:21
    
I defined it not protected, but package local. Indeed, may be it would be better to define it protected. I did that because author of the question said: I need read only internally. –  Andremoniy Jan 18 '13 at 9:23

I don't think there is a solution that gives you exactly what you want, but maybe something close to it:

interface Block {
    void connect(Block b);
    void step();
}
interface ReadableBlock extends Block {
    double read();
}

The method read() still needs to be public, but you can let the exterior code only refer to implementations via the Block interface, while the implementation itself is from ReadableBlock

public cass ABlockImpl implements ReadableBlock {
    ....
}
Block b = new ABlockImpl();
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is very close to Peter Lawrey's solution. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 17 '13 at 15:56
    
Except that my interface are of same visibility and he didn't specify what the interfaces contain. But I have to admit, I only skimmed his answer ;) –  Sentry Jan 17 '13 at 16:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.