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I need help to get a substring from a file. I have two variable, the IP source and IP destination address. I need to validate lines in file containing the two IP's and get the port of the source address.

This is the input file:

15:29:18.164566 IP (tos 0x0, ttl 1, id 2394, offset 0, flags [none], proto UDP (17), length 125)
    10.0.0.155.58363 > 239.255.255.254.1900: UDP, length 97
    0x0000:  4600 0024 0000 0000 0102 3ad3 0a00 0000  F..$......:.....
    0x0010:  e000 0001 9404 0000 1101 ebfe 0000 0000  ................
    0x0020:  0300 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000       ..............
15:29:18.164566 IP (tos 0x0, ttl 128, id 2394, offset 0, flags [none], proto UDP (17), length 125)
    10.0.0.131.58363 > 239.255.255.250.1900: UDP, length 97
    0x0000:  4600 0024 0000 0000 0102 3ad3 0a00 0000  F..$......:.....
    0x0010:  e000 0001 9404 0000 1101 ebfe 0000 0000  ................
 15:29:18.164566 IP (tos 0x0, ttl 1, id 2394, offset 0, flags [none], proto UDP (17), length 125)
    10.0.0.155.58363 > 239.255.255.254.1900: UDP, length 97
    0x0000:  4600 0024 0000 0000 0102 3ad3 0a00 0000  F..$......:.....
    0x0010:  e000 0001 9404 0000 1101 ebfe 0000 0000  ................
    0x0020:  0300 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000       ..............
15:29:18.164566 IP (tos 0x0, ttl 128, id 2394, offset 0, flags [none], proto UDP (17), length 125)
    10.0.0.131.58363 > 239.255.255.250.1900: UDP, length 97
    0x0000:  4600 0024 0000 0000 0102 3ad3 0a00 0000  F..$......:.....
    0x0010:  e000 0001 9404 0000 1101 ebfe 0000 0000  ................
    0x0020:  0300 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000       ..............
   0x0020:  0300 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000       ..............
15:29:18.164566 IP (tos 0x0, ttl 128, id 2394, offset 0, flags [none], proto UDP (17), length 125)
    10.0.0.155.80 > 239.255.255.250.1900: UDP, length 97
    0x0000:  4600 0024 0000 0000 0102 3ad3 0a00 0000  F..$......:.....
    0x0010:  e000 0001 9404 0000 1101 ebfe 0000 0000  ................
    0x0020:  0300 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000       ..............
   0x0020:  0300 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000       ..............

The two vars:

ips=10.0.0.155

ipd=239.255.255.254

The output result must be:

58363   

This is the port of the IP source address 10.0.0.155.58363.

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closed as not constructive by Ash Burlaczenko, ewall, dty, Jefffrey, PsychoDad Jan 17 '13 at 17:07

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what is this output result? not make any sense.. –  Satish Jan 17 '13 at 14:47
    
Is the port of the ip adreess source 10.0.0.155.58363 –  Litox Jan 17 '13 at 14:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using lookarounds with grep:

$ ips=10.0.0.155

$ ipd=239.255.255.254

$ grep -Po "(?<=$ips\.)\d+(?= > $ipd)" file
58363
58363

File has repeated line so pipe to uniq:

$ grep -Po "(?<=$ips\.)\d+(?= > $ipd)" file | uniq
58363

Or using a capture group with sed:

$ sed -n '/'"$ipd"'/s/.*'"$ips"'\.\([0-9]\+\).*/\1/p' file
58363
58363

$ sed -n '/'"$ipd"'/s/.*'"$ips"'\.\([0-9]\+\).*/\1/p' file | uniq
58363

Or in awk:

$ awk -v s=$ips -v d=$ipd '$1~s && $3~d {sub(/.*\./,"",$1);print $1}' file
58363
58363

$ awk -v s=$ips -v d=$ipd '$1~s&&$3~d&&!u[$0]++{sub(/.*\./,"",$1);print $1}' file
58363
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks a lot man –  Litox Jan 17 '13 at 15:35

Hope it help you. You can replace IP with your variable.

[spatel@mg0008 ~]$ grep 10.0.0.155.58363 /tmp/outputfile.txt
    10.0.0.155.58363 > 239.255.255.254.1900: UDP, length 97
    10.0.0.155.58363 > 239.255.255.254.1900: UDP, length 97

More trimming...

[spatel@mg0008 tmp]$ grep 10.0.0.155.58363 /tmp/outputfile.txt | awk -F'.' '{print $5}' | awk '{print $1}'
58363
58363
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't check the line for the destination IP so will have false matches and the port is unknown and you have hard coded it into the search also grep | awk | awk isn't necessary. This isn't a solution to the given problem. –  iiSeymour Jan 17 '13 at 15:23

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