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This is a really odd issue. We have a Try Catch with multiple Catch blocks. The first Catch block has no code, just a comment.

Try
  'Some Code
Catch ex As ThreadAbortException
  'Do Nothing
Catch ex As Exception
  HandleException(ex)
End Try

If an exception other than a ThreadAbortException is thrown, it is caught by the second Catch, as expected. However, when stepping through code in VS2010, the ex object is Nothing in that case. So far, we have found two ways to "fix" this issue.

Fix 1: Rename the first exception variable.

Try
  'Some Code
Catch tex As ThreadAbortException
  'Do Nothing
Catch ex As Exception
  HandleException(ex)
End Try

Fix 2: Add any line of code to the first Catch block.

Try
  'Some Code
Catch ex As ThreadAbortException
  Dim i As Integer = 1
Catch ex As Exception
  HandleException(ex)
End Try

The code in HandleException seems to still function properly if it's run, in any of the above cases. Is this a bug in Visual Studio or debugger? Or are we missing something here and the first block of code above is invalid?

This is all being done in .NET 4.0.

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Are you stepping through the code in release mode? –  pstrjds Jan 17 '13 at 15:15
2  
+1. Good question, a rare gem on StackOverflow. –  Neolisk Jan 17 '13 at 15:27
1  
This debugger bug looks fixed in VS2012. Do make sure that you've got SP1 installed, it fixes many debugger bugs. –  Hans Passant Jan 17 '13 at 17:21
2  
We do have SP1 installed. We also have VS2012, but are still using VS2010 for most development. If this works in VS2012, that would really confirm this being a VS2010 bug. –  Dan P Jan 17 '13 at 18:24
    
Wow! You gained 90 reputation with a simple question :) –  Teejay Jan 18 '13 at 10:23
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Teejay has the correct answer.

However, if your Catch block is empty it makes no sense at all to handle this exception. You just want to prevent the last block from catching it. You can use your method – but consider that having an empty Catch block is normally inacceptable: exceptions should either not be caught, or should be handled properly; swallowing them silently must be seen as a bug. Your case is an exception to this rule but as such it needs to be documented in code since it will confuse careful maintainers otherwise.

Well, VB has a special idiom for exactly this situation:

Try
    ' …
Catch ex As Exception When Not TypeOf ex Is ThreadAbortException
    ' Only executed if `ex` isn’t a ThreadAbortException
End Try

This code doesn’t catch ThreadAbortException at all, which is the right thing to do if you don’t want to handle it: ThreadAbortException cannot be swallowed so even when you catch it, it will be rethrown at the end of the Catch block.

Note that this is fundamentally different from SysDragon’s answer which uses a conventional If statement while the code here uses a special clause in the Catch statement as a filter.

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There is a lot of VB that is "special". –  DeanOC Jan 17 '13 at 20:18
    
This is a wonderful syntax which I didn't know before. Anyway, it's importanto to notice that this behaves different from Dan's code, in fact it does not catch ThreadAbortException that is thrown out from Try...Catch and must be handled externally to avoid the program to crash. –  Teejay Jan 17 '13 at 20:30
    
@Teejay No, it behaves the same: ThreadAbortException cannot be caught. If you catch it, it will simply be rethrown. I should probably state this explicitly in my answer. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 17 '13 at 20:37
    
This is great. This is really what we want to accomplish (since we cannot swallow the ThreadAbortException). This is a much cleaner way of doing what we want to do. –  Dan P Jan 17 '13 at 21:16
    
@KonradRudolph Mhhh, not really clear. In Dan's code, the ThreadAbortEx is caught and swallowed. As you wrote in your edit, with When Not ... the ThreadAbortEx is not caught at all instead. Happy that this is what Dan was looking for, but IMHO the two blocks act differently. Am I missing something? Help me understand. –  Teejay Jan 17 '13 at 21:55
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Ok let me elaborate...

It appears that you must have a "result" in each catch. If you simply want nothing to happen for a specific catch, don't include it, or have it move to a different place in your code.

Try
   'Some Code
Catch ex As ThreadAbortException
   'Do something(ex: HandleExceptionSub())
Catch ex As Exception
   HandleException(ex)
End Try

If you "catch" an exception you have to do something with it.

EDIT:

I have also found this information you that can help further inform you about the way a try catch works:

Multiple Catch Blocks

A try block can throw multiple exceptions, which can handle by using multiple catch blocks. Remember that more specialized catch block should come before a generalized one. Otherwise the compiler will show a compilation error. Multiple Catch Blocks

It isn't a "Bug" with the Debugger. The debugger is meant to help you find and handle all exceptions.

EDIT: Seems that this exception could be avoided completely from what I read in another post. And it seems that it would be better to avoid the exception instead of not dealing with it. Handling ThreadAbortException

EDIT: Just found more information on multiple catch blocks in try. This is from MSDN and states that a catch blocks after a blank catch block will never be reached...Try Catch Finally Statement Further proof that this is NOT a bug but the expected functionality to enforce handling all exceptions in your code.

EDIT: To set some people in the comments straight I have created a very simple test program to see if this is indeed a bug. My findings are that the catch blocks work perfectly. Seems that following the MSDN documented way of creating a Try Catch with multiple Catch blocks works as they say it does.

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            if (textBox1.Text == "")
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("textBox1", "TextBox can not be empty");
            }
            else
            {
                MyString(textBox1.Text);
            }
        }
        catch (ArgumentNullException ex)
        {
            //nothing
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Test: " + ex.Message);
        }
    }

    private int MyString(string text)
    {
        return int.Parse(text);
    }

I created a simple form with a button and a textbox. If the textbox is empty I throw an ArgumentNullException, and in the "MyString" I parse a string to an integer which throws a "FormatException". Having a blank catch block, which is NOT the right way to handle a "caught" exception does indeed work. So as far as I can see this is not a bug. Apparently the only thing I can agree with Teejay and Konrad about is that you can NOT catch and handle the ThreadAbortException using the try catch method. Konrad's solution is the best way to code your try catch.

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Probably, he simply want to silently "suppress" all ThreadAbortEx. –  Teejay Jan 17 '13 at 16:06
    
To silently "suppress" the exception you still have to "handle" it. If you want to not "handle" it, fully silence it then don't "catch" it. –  jforward5 Jan 17 '13 at 16:09
1  
Virtually all the information in this post is wrong (except for the last paragraph). This is a bug in the debugger, and you do not have to have code in the handler block. And lastly, your comment suggesting to use GoTo here is simply atrocious. There are very few (if any) valid uses for GoTo. This isn’t one. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 17 '13 at 20:09
1  
@jforward5 Teejay has posted the proof. In addition, a look into the VB language specification (§10.10.1.2) will show you that Catch blocks are allowed to be empty. In fact, no need to look there: if it were different, the compiler would flag this as an error. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 17 '13 at 20:17
1  
@jforward5 Read Teejay’s answer again: It is a bug in the debugger because the debugger shows the ex object as having the value Nothing when in fact it observably has a different value. The debugger shows a wrong value. That is a bug. There doesn’t have to be a KB article about this for it to be a bug: Microsoft isn’t omniscient, they don’t know about all the bugs, and it’s possible that nobody has noticed this one before. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 17 '13 at 20:39
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It seems to be a VS' debugger bug.

PROOF

If you write:

Try
    Throw New InvalidOperationException("MESSAGE")
Catch ex As ArgumentException
    'Do Nothing
Catch ex As Exception
    Debug.WriteLine(ex)
End Try

and you look at ex it evaluates to Nothing in Quickwatch mode

BUT

in the console the program correctly prints System.InvalidOperationException: MESSAGE

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