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Got a quick question which I hope someone can answer. Basically I have a String variable which needs changing based upon the value in a combo box which has an event listener attached to it. However if I make the string final then it cant be changed, but if i don't make it final then eclipse moans that it isn't final. Whats the best (and simplest) work around?

Code is as follows

final String dialogOutCome = "";

//create a listener for the combo box
Listener selection = new Listener() {

    public void handleEvent(Event event) {
    //get the value from the combo box
    String comboVal = combo.getText();

    switch (comboVal) {
         case "A": dialogOutCome = "a";
         case "B": dialogOutCome = "b";
         case "C": dialogOutCome = "c";
         case "D": dialogOutCome = "d";
    }
   }
};
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I don't think anybody. –  Roman C Jan 17 '13 at 15:16

6 Answers 6

You can't.

Consider this:

  • the local variable exists as long as the method it's declared in runs.
  • as soon as that method invocation ends (usually because the method exists) the variable vanishes
  • the listener can (and usually does) live much longer

So what should happen when the method returned already and the listener tries to modify the local variable?

Because this question does not have a really good answer, they decided to make that scenario impossible by not allowing access to non-final local variables.

There are two ways around this problem:

  • try to change a field instead of a local variable (this probably also fits better with the life-time of the listener) or
  • use a final local variable, of which you can change the content (for example a List or a String[] with a single element).
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These answers are all telling you how to make a flawed approach "work" at a superficial level.

The real problem is that you're trying to apply traditional, synchronous, "call/return" coding patterns to a library that doesn't support it. The real answer is that when the event you're waiting for happens asynchronously, the stuff you want to do after the event has to happen asynchronously as well. Understanding the event-driven nature of Swing is vital to being effective in it.

In other words, think of what piece of code will read dialogOutCome. Will some action be performed? If so, perform that action from the handler (or as a result of the handler) instead.

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Just create simple StringWrapper object:

static class StringWrapper {
       String value;

       StringWrapper(String value) {
           this.value = value;
       } 
}

and use it in type of field dialogOutCome:

final StringWrapper dialogOutCome = new StringWrapper("");

Listener selection = new Listener() {

    public void handleEvent(Event event) {
        String comboVal = combo.getText();

        switch (comboVal) {
          case "A": dialogOutCome.value = " gay";
          case "B": dialogOutCome.value = " ugly";
          case "C": dialogOutCome.value = " smelly";
          case "D": dialogOutCome.value = " great";
        }
   }
};
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please starting with combo.getSelectedItem();, otherwise return nothing –  mKorbel Jan 17 '13 at 15:15
    
@mKorbel, sorry, I can't understand for whom you add this comment? If for me, then I'm just showing pattern in brief without details of correct deep implementation intended idea of author. –  Andremoniy Jan 17 '13 at 15:17
    
hmmm, pseudo_code created real mess, this question isn't about internal event from XxxComboBoxModel, but get String from XxxListener then doesn't make me any sence, –  mKorbel Jan 17 '13 at 15:30
    
Hmm, now Eclipse is throwing a paddy over the StringWrapper class, its not allowed to be static, only public, final or abstract? –  user1987029 Jan 17 '13 at 16:25
    
@user1987029 remove static modifier. It was just an example, I don't know where you put it :) –  Andremoniy Jan 17 '13 at 16:50

An alternative is to use this approach.

public class ReturnValueListener implements Listener {

    private String dialogOutCome;

    public void handleEvent(Event event) {
        //get the value from the combo box
        String comboVal = combo.getText();

        switch (comboVal) {
            case "A": dialogOutCome = " gay";
            ase "B": dialogOutCome = " ugly";
            case "C": dialogOutCome = " smelly";
            case "D": dialogOutCome = " great";
        }
    }

    public String getDialogOutCome() {
        return dialogOutCome;
    }
}

Listener selection = new ReturnValueListener();
//Set my listener somewhere,
....registerListener(selection);
//After my handleEvent is called
String dialogOutCome = selection.getDialogOutCome();
share|improve this answer
    
please starting with combo.getSelectedItem();, otherwise return nothing –  mKorbel Jan 17 '13 at 15:16
    
@mKorbel, I don't quite follow. –  Buhake Sindi Jan 17 '13 at 15:17
    
up to you, read my comment to OP –  mKorbel Jan 17 '13 at 15:18
    
@mKorbel, I understand what you're saying. I think the OP is using pseudocode here.... –  Buhake Sindi Jan 17 '13 at 15:19

You can use a setter for indirection. This will take away the final restriction (since the field you're accessing is 'this' instead of 'dialogOutcome'.

String dialogOutCome = "";

void setOutcome(String value){
  dialogOutCome = value;
}

//create a listener for the combo box
Listener selection = new Listener() {

    public void handleEvent(Event event) {
    //get the value from the combo box
    String comboVal = combo.getText();

    switch (comboVal) {
         case "A": setOutcome(" gay");
         case "B": setOutcome(" ugly");
         case "C": setOutcome(" smelly");
         case "D": setOutcome(" great");
    }
   }
};
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Workaround solution: Use StringBuilder instead of String. Of course, StringBuilder cannot be changed reference in the handleEvent, but we could invoke its method.

    final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    Listener selection = new Listener() {

        public void handleEvent(Event event) {
        ...
        switch (comboVal) {
             case "A": sb.delete(0, sb.length()).append("a");
             case "B": sb.delete(0, sb.length()).append("b");
            ...
        }
       }
    };

...
System.out.println(sb.toString());

Then you could get String value by StringBuilder.toString();

EDIT: Please provide the reason voting down this answer.

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1  
This is possible but not good design: using a StringBuilder as a "mutable String" is an abuse of the class (note: I didn't downvote, but I guess that's the reason). –  Joachim Sauer Jan 17 '13 at 15:47
1  
It's just workaround solution to fix the case. Sure, we could wrap a String in a class as mutable String. –  卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Jan 17 '13 at 15:50

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