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I have the following code (like, for real, this is my real code) :

<?php
class Foobar
{
  public static function foo()
  {
    exit('foo');
  }
}

When I run $foobar = new FooBar; $foobar->foo() it displays foo.

Why would PHP try to use a static method in an object context ? Is there a way to avoid this ?


Ok you guys didn't get my problem : I know the differences between static and non static methods and how to call them. That's my whole point, if I call $foobar->foo(), why does PHP tries to run a static method ?


Note : I run PHP 5.4.4, error reporting to E_ALL.

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3  
"chain"? What do you mean? –  phant0m Jan 17 '13 at 15:18
1  
Am I not understanding the question? You exit with the message "foo". –  Daniel Jan 17 '13 at 15:18
2  
@Daniel It should be called Foobar::foo, though. –  Waleed Khan Jan 17 '13 at 15:19
4  
You're not chaining a static method, you're calling a static method (albeit as though it was an instance method). Enable error logging –  Mark Baker Jan 17 '13 at 15:19
2  
This isn't chaining "$foobar = new FooBar; $foobar->foo()" method chaining is $foobar->foo()->doSomething() –  Eoin Murphy Jan 17 '13 at 15:20
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

To call a static method, you don't use:

$foobar = new FooBar;
$foobar->foo()

You call

FooBar::foo();

The PHP manual says...

Declaring class properties or methods as static makes them accessible without needing an instantiation of the class. A property declared as static can not be accessed with an instantiated class object (though a static method can).

This is why you are able to call the method on an instance, even though that is not what you intended to do.

Whether or not you call a static method statically or on an instance, you cannot access $this in a static method.

http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.static.php

You can check to see if you are in a static context, although I would question whether this is overkill...

class Foobar
{
  public static function foo()
  {
    $backtrace = debug_backtrace();
    if ($backtrace[1]['type'] == '::') {
      exit('foo');
    }
  }
}

One additional note - I believe that the method is always executed in a static context, even if it is called on an instance. I'm happy to be correct on this if I'm wrong though.

share|improve this answer
    
I know that, that's not my problem : see my edit. –  Maxime Fabre Jan 17 '13 at 15:23
    
@MaximeFabre updated based on your edit. –  Steve Fenton Jan 17 '13 at 15:24
2  
@MaximeFabre This answer clearly answers Your question. –  shadyyx Jan 17 '13 at 15:26
1  
He was probably expecting error when calling static function in object context so his question is why isn't there error, not how to do it. –  Valdars Jan 17 '13 at 15:39
1  
Is there a way to avoid this ? This is also part of the question, that was not answered. –  phant0m Jan 17 '13 at 15:40
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Since PHP is quite a forgiving language you could prevent this default behavior by overloading __callStatic and maybe use reflections to validate the method scope.

http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.overloading.php#object.call

http://php.net/ReflectionClass

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