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I need to extract coincidence lines from a file with a regular expression:

This is the content of file:

netbios-ns      137/tcp                         # NETBIOS Name Service
netbios-ns      137/udp
hkp             11371/tcp                       # OpenPGP HTTP Keyserver
hkp             11371/udp                       # OpenPGP HTTP Keyserver
bprd            13720/tcp                       # VERITAS NetBackup
bprd            13720/udp
vopied          13783/udp

I need to filter using 137 with grep:

grep -n -e "137" file

The output must be:

netbios-ns      137/tcp                         # NETBIOS Name Service
netbios-ns      137/udp
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fgrep " 137/" services.txt –  jeffmurphy Jan 17 '13 at 15:52
    
this is irrelevant to this question. Just mention that if you want to check what program/process is using which port, /etc/services file could sometimes mislead you. use lsof instead. –  Kent Jan 17 '13 at 16:18
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you always have preceding whitespace and a trailing slash then:

$ grep " 137/" file
netbios-ns 137/tcp # NETBIOS Name Service
netbios-ns 137/udp

Or more robust, check for non-digits either side:

$ grep "[^[:digit:]]137[^[:digit:]]" file
netbios-ns 137/tcp # NETBIOS Name Service
netbios-ns 137/udp
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Or even grep -w 137 /etc/services. Allow grep to wrap up the word-boundary logic for you... –  twalberg Jan 17 '13 at 17:26
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Use grep's word boundaries: grep '\<137\>' file

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