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So this code has an error because the base class has parameters right? Because the default constructor of each subclass calls the default constructor of the base class? and we don't have a default constructor for the base class which causes the error?

Did I misunderstand it, also what is the best way around this while implementing the principle of code-reuse because I'm trying to practice programming in OOP

class A {
    int item;

    A(int item) {
        this.item = item;
    }
}

class B extends A {
    int subitem;

    B(int item) {
        super(item);
        subitem = item * 2;
    }
}

class C extends A {

}
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2  
what does the error message say? – Sam I am Jan 17 '13 at 16:12
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Firstly, on the title of this question:

Subclasses inherting base class constructor while maintaining principle of code-reuse

Constructors are never inherited. It just doesn't happen. What you've been demonstrating is not inheritance - it's just the requirement that any constructor (other than the one in java.lang.Object) has to either chain to another constructor in the same class, or chain to a constructor in the superclass.

So this code has an error because the base class has parameters right?

Well, to be precisely, it's because the base class has no parameterless constructor.

Because the default constructor of each subclass calls the default constructor of the base class?

A default constructor is only provided if you don't specify any constructors explicitly. The default constructor always calls a parameterless constructor in the base class, implicitly.

and we don't have a default constructor for the base class which causes the error?

We don't have a parameterless constructor for the base class. Basically it's equivalent to writing:

class C extends A {
    C() {
        super();
    }
}

If you understand why that doesn't compile, you understand why the version without any explicitly-declared constructors doesn't compile, as they're equivalent.

Did I misunderstand it, also what is the best way around this

Around what? You can't create an instance of A without providing an item. It would be bad if it did compile - what would the item be? Every instance of C can also be considered to be an A, which requires an item...

You could write a parameterless constructor which provides some sort of default to the superclass constructor:

public C() {
    super("default item");
}

if that's what you want. But beyond that, we can't really suggest alternatives without knowing what you're trying to achieve.

Note that inheritance is far from the only way of achieving code reuse - and in fact I personally prefer reuse via composition instead of inheritance in general. Inheritance is powerful, but overused IMO.

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your class C extends A by which it has to satisfy the contract of calling its one-arg constructor explicitly in your constructor, or you could simply have a no-args default constructor defined in your class A like:

class A {
    int item;

    A(int item) {
        this.item = item;
    }
    A(){
     //default stuff
     }
}
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