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I've been programming in C# (as well as a few other languages) for some time now, but just recently decided that I should start writing custom classes to get a better feel for Object-Oriented Programming. To that end, I started with a base class of Vehicle, and some derived classes, to work on inheritance.

What I'm trying to do here is set up some default values and logic in the base calss of Vehicle, while having the derived classes implement some information which determines the differences. For example, while I set up the _wheelsNumber, _motorType, and _horsePower variables and logic in the base class, I would have each class (Car, Truck, Semi, Moped, etc.) set its _wheelsNumber and trigger the flow of logic to calculate out the rest of the properties.

However, I'm not sure I've built my classes in the right fashion to achieve those ends. I'm not clear on whether I'm even remotely doing the right things with my construcor and my get/set accessors (as I don't want the user to be choosing things like how many wheels a Car has, I haven't declared set accessors). One thing I think I've noticed is that the user would have to ask the program for the number of wheels before the motor type and that before the horsepower. I think this is because they're not calculated within the constructor, but I'm not certain.

Anyone clarity would be vastly appreciated.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace VehicleClasses
{
    abstract public class Vehicle
    {
        protected const int smallMotor = 1;
        protected const int mediumMotor = 3;
        protected const int largeMotor = 5;
        protected const int largerMotor = 7;
        protected const int hugeMotor = 9;
        protected const int wrongMotor = 9001;

        public Vehicle()
        {
            _horsePower = (_motorType * _motorType) * 8;
        }

        protected int _wheelsNumber;
        public int wheelsNumber
        {
            get
            {
                return _wheelsNumber;
            }
        }

        protected int _motorType;
        public int motorType
        {
            get
            {
                if (_wheelsNumber < 4)
            {
                _motorType = smallMotor;
            }

            else if (_wheelsNumber >= 4 && wheelsNumber <= 6)
            {
                _motorType = mediumMotor;
            }

            else if (_wheelsNumber > 6 && wheelsNumber < 10)
            {
                _motorType = largeMotor;
            }

            else if (_wheelsNumber >= 10 && wheelsNumber < 18)
            {
                _motorType = largerMotor;
            }

            else if (_wheelsNumber >= 18)
            {
                _motorType = hugeMotor;
            }

            else
            {
                _motorType = wrongMotor;
            }                
                return _motorType;
            }
        }

        protected int _horsePower;
        public int horsePower
        {
            get
            {
                return _horsePower;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You should use an enum. –  SLaks Jan 17 '13 at 16:21
    
You should not use protected fields; turn them into protected properties instead (in case you ever need to intercept writes to them, for example for validation). As your code is, a derived class can, for example, set _wheelsNumber to -100000 –  Matthew Watson Jan 17 '13 at 16:32
    
@Slaks: Although I completely agree (I assume you refer to the "...Motor" consts), it feels like answering the question "I want to go the moon" with "you should use a Philips head screwdriver". As for the question: The problem you describe is too broad and/or too vague. There are several ways to go around solving, but without knowing more or having a more concise question, there's no way to answer it. –  Willem van Rumpt Jan 17 '13 at 16:41
    
@MatthewWatson I'm not sure I understand the extent of what you're saying. Should I rewrite those as protected properties with the logic of how their values are determined in the get/set accessors, or should I simply create them as properties, and that will make the difference? –  Miles Grimes Jan 17 '13 at 16:51
    
@WillemvanRumpt-- I'm sorry, I thought I had explained myself. How can I clarify the question? –  Miles Grimes Jan 17 '13 at 16:52

1 Answer 1

This is a common misapplication of inheritance. Subclasses should extend behavior, not just modify the values of state.

In your example, there is only one free variable, the number of wheels. Everything else is a derived trait based on that. Change the constructor of vehicle to take the number of wheels as an argument, then (if desired) you can add public static methods to the class like "CreateMotorcycle()" that create a vehicle with the correct number of wheels.

Alternate Suggested Exercise

Like I mentioned before, inheritance is useful when you want to extend behavior. For example, lets say you have an "Employee" base class. To keep things simple, lets say each Employee has one junior and one senior.

Whenever an employee wants time off, they have to ask their senior, but not every employee can approves. The request has to get passed up the chain until it reaches a "Manager", which is a derived instance.

Flipping it around, lets say the most senior employee is the owner. When he wants the company to do something, he doesn;t do it himself. He sends the command down the chain. Each layer might modify what needs to be done. For example, the owner says it needs to be done in 365 days, each manager says it has half the time he was told, and the worker completes the task.

Each "class" in these examples (Worker/Manager/Owner) behave differently when the same method is called. But having them all implement the same base class makes it easy to chain them together! this is a variant on the "Chain of Responsibility" and "Decorator" patterns.

share|improve this answer
    
I think, if I understand you correctly, you're objecting to my use of multiple derived classes because they do not implement extended behavior which the base "Vehicle" class lacks, correct? While I think that is a fair objection, I plan to implement extended behavior in my derived classes-- it's simply not something I want to write until my base functionality is in place and has working code. As well, I don't want to give the Vehicle class methods such as CreateMotorcycle(), because if anything I would want a Factory or something else more appropriate to create vehicles. Is that more clear? –  Miles Grimes Jan 17 '13 at 22:35

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