Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to somehow mark a few words in a text just for further programmatical processing, not for any visuell kind of stuff? Let´s say I have following text:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren, no sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.

Let´s say gubergren is my keyword. I cannot just parse the text for gubergren because I do not know the value of my keyword. What I could do is mark my keywords with mark up while rendering:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd <span class="keyword">gubergren</span>, no sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.

Now I can easily parse the text for span element with keyword as class name and I can fetch a list of my keywords. But what if span is associated with CSS styles? This will just look silly in the browser. On the other hand, I cannot just invent an own tag, because I definetly want my site to stay HTML valid.

What do you suggest?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You've got the right approach. Use span tags with the class 'keyword'. You shouldn't need to worry about css issues, especially if you are the one writing the css. Don't style the 'keyword' class.

If you aren't writing the CSS, I can't imagine a good reason why someone would style a simple tag without a class selector attached. Doing so has the potential to break a lot of things. If you are worried that the 'keyword' class has css attached, then make the class name something unique.

If you some else is styling the tag with no class selector, define your own style which gets rid of the formatting specifically for your span tags that have the class of "keyword".

span.keyword {
   border: 0px;
   display: inline;
   background-color: transparent;
   ... whatever other formatting you may need to remove...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the input. Even though you cannot imagine a good reason to style the span element, I cannot expect other people to think likewise. –  Amberlamps Jan 17 '13 at 22:39
    
"because I definetly want my site to stay HTML valid." Sounds like it's your site? Therefore you have control over this. Don't style <span> tags that have no class selector and it won't be an issue. If you are using some third-party scripts or something with style sheets that are styling <span> tags with no class assigned. Don't. They shouldn't be doing that. –  Jeffrey Ray Jan 17 '13 at 22:53
    
This is no way to work. You cannot expect that everyone will follow your expectations. –  Amberlamps Jan 17 '13 at 23:02
    
1) That's why I asked if it was "YOUR" website as it says in your post. If so, then you have control over this. You don't need to worry about anyone else. You're calling the shots. Someone else working on it with you. Tell them not to style <span> tags without a class selector. That's referred to as collaboration. –  Jeffrey Ray Jan 17 '13 at 23:18
    
2) If am creating a website, and want to use some 3rd party scripts/css/etc I expect them not to interfere with/break the rest of my website. I think we can agree that is a pretty standard expectation. A will written 3rd party module would NOT break your site. Styling a <span> tag with no other selectors is a pretty sure way to break a site. Therefore it is a pretty safe expectation. If their a third party module is breaking your site because of this, that means their code is not well written, and you should seriously rethink using it in the first place. –  Jeffrey Ray Jan 17 '13 at 23:18

How about 2 invisibles span around the key word ?

Example :

<span style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span>gubergren<span style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span>

You can retrieve the spans and get the content between the 2 spans. But i don't feel it's a very good solution.

The best solution is to not apply css to spans with a specific class. But i guess you already know it.

You can also use a simple html attribute. Example :

<p data-keyword="gubergren">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren, no sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.</p>
share|improve this answer
    
It would not help against the assumed styling of span elements, which was the issue here. And using an attribute per p element does not turn words to elements. –  Jukka K. Korpela Jan 17 '13 at 18:37
    
Actually this is a very interesting approach. My wrapper element' would have my custom CSS class anyway. And in this class I could specify position: absolute; top: -999px; left: -999px`. My extra markup would not be visible at all and it also would not effect the styling of the keyword. –  Amberlamps Jan 17 '13 at 22:43

I am not sure where the text is coming from. In our CMS we use || for special codes. So I'll have in my copy:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor
invidunt ut labore et dolore ||keyword|| magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero

Because || is rarely used for anything else, I then parse my data server side looking for ||. I'll use a mid function of sorts to get the data out I need and alter the copy as I need to. Adding html elements around the words, replacing the words with forms or other server side code to process. The capabilities are endless.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the input. Your solution would totally mess up the syntax of a sentence. Even though you are probably replacing the || with anything readable, the || would still be hardcoded in the document. –  Amberlamps Jan 17 '13 at 22:41
    
Well, our data is stored in a database. So we don't have documents per say. It may not suit your needs. Your post mentioned it wasn't for styling but for processing, so I figured this content was in a DB or something like that. This is the route Wordpress plugins often use and has worked for us so as I still don't allow server side code in our WYSIWYG's but I can allow access to certain functions that I choose to expose. –  Leeish Jan 17 '13 at 22:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.