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I want remove comment lines, beginning with "#", from the middle of a file, without removing header comment lines at the top of the file. How can I do this using shell scripts and standard Unix tools?

#DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE.
#Mon Jan 14 22:25:16 PST 2013
/test/v1=1.0
#PROPERTIES P1.   <------REMOVE THIS 
/test/p1=1.0
/test/p2=1.0
/test/p3=3.0
/test/p41=4.0
/test/v6=1.0
#. P2 PROPERTIES   <------REMOVE THIS
/test/p1=1.0
/test/p2=1.0
/test/p3=3.0
/test/p41=4.0
/test/v6=1.0
.................
.................

Output

#DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE.
#Mon Jan 14 22:25:16 PST 2013
/test/v1=1.0
/test/p1=1.0
/test/p2=1.0
/test/p3=3.0
/test/p41=4.0
/test/v6=1.0
/test/p1=1.0
/test/p2=1.0
/test/p3=3.0
/test/p41=4.0
/test/v6=1.0
.................
.................
share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  gpojd Jan 17 '13 at 16:41
1  
You're asking how to modify a file that says "DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE." at the top? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 17 '13 at 16:41
    
I tried using sed the problem is that i'm not able to remove the comment in between the file, all are getting removed, I try to keep the first comment and rest all comment should be Ignored not able ti sucedd –  anish Jan 17 '13 at 16:44
    
I am gonna second the comment above. You shouldn't modify that file. –  thang Jan 17 '13 at 16:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can try awk:

awk 'NR==1 || NR==2 || !/^#/' file.txt
share|improve this answer
    
that work like a Charm –  anish Jan 17 '13 at 16:48

If you don't want to use awk:

head -n 2 file.txt > output.txt
grep -v "^#.*" file.txt >> output.txt
share|improve this answer
3  
You can do that in one shot: { head -n 2 file.txt; grep -v '^#' file.txt; } > output.txt –  glenn jackman Jan 17 '13 at 18:45

With GNU sed, you have

sed '3,${/^#/d}' 
share|improve this answer

You want to echo the lines beginning with '#', but only at the beginning, using only bash? Start with a boolean start=true; then go line-by-line, set start=false when the line doesn’t start with #, and echo each line only if you are at the start or the line does not start with #.

Here’s the file script:

#!/bin/bash

start=true
while read line; do
    if $start; then
        if [ "${line:0:1}" != "#" ]; then
            start=false
        fi
    fi
    if $start || [ "${line:0:1}" != "#" ];  then
        echo "${line}"
    fi
done

Running it:

$ cat input
#DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE.
#Mon Jan 14 22:25:16 PST 2013
/test/v1=1.0
#PROPERTIES P1.
/test/p1=1.0
/test/p2=1.0
/test/p3=3.0
/test/p41=4.0
/test/v6=1.0
#. P2 PROPERTIES
/test/p1=1.0
/test/p2=1.0
/test/p3=3.0
/test/p41=4.0
/test/v6=1.0
$ ./script < input
#DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE.
#Mon Jan 14 22:25:16 PST 2013
/test/v1=1.0
/test/p1=1.0
/test/p2=1.0
/test/p3=3.0
/test/p41=4.0
/test/v6=1.0
/test/p1=1.0
/test/p2=1.0
/test/p3=3.0
/test/p41=4.0
/test/v6=1.0
share|improve this answer
1  
Why did you choose to run the while loop in a subshell? –  glenn jackman Jan 17 '13 at 18:46
    
Good point—there is no good reason for that. I’ve fixed it. Thanks! –  andrewdotn Jan 17 '13 at 20:37

This might work for you (GNU sed);

 sed '/^[^#]/,$!b;/^#/d' file
share|improve this answer
    
are you missing the closing slash on the opening regex ? –  glenn jackman Jan 17 '13 at 23:34
    
@glennjackman Oops! Thanks. –  potong Jan 18 '13 at 7:39

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