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I read lines from a file and load them into a LinkedHashMap to preserve the insertion order. At a certain point of my algorithm I have to modify both a key and it's corresponding value without affecting the insertion order. Here is an example :

This is the initial content of my LinkedHashMap

"k1" -> "v1"
"k2" -> "v2"
"k3" -> "v3"
"k4" -> "v4"
"k5" -> "v5"

I want to modify k3 and v3 so that I get :

"k1" -> "v1"
"k2" -> "v2"
"k33" -> "v33"
"k4" -> "v4"
"k5" -> "v5"

But if I use

map.remove("k3");
map.put("k33", "v33");

Then what I get instead is :

"k1" -> "v1"
"k2" -> "v2"
"k4" -> "v4"
"k5" -> "v5"
"k33" -> "v33"

Which is a perfectly normal behavior, but not what I wanted to do.

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1  
Why don't you use a List of Pairs if order is what matters to you? –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 17 '13 at 16:45
2  
You can't modify a key in a Map without removing it. You need to preserve order in a different collection if this is what you want. e.g. a List of keys –  Peter Lawrey Jan 17 '13 at 16:46
    
Order is not the only thing that matters to me, I need also to be able to search for a key efficiently. –  restricteur Jan 17 '13 at 16:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the order of the enteries is important, I'd keep a separate list that maintains that order - this will make it obvious to anyone subsequently looking at your code what's going on.

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But If I do so, then I need to update that separate list whenever I call the put method. And to update that list I need to search for the key (and the list is big). Do you think it would still be efficient ? –  restricteur Jan 17 '13 at 16:53
    
I'd put the two update calls in a method and just call that method when an update is required. With regards to efficiency, first make it work, then make it fast if you see a performance problem. If there's IO involved manipulation of a list is unlikely to be the performance bottle neck. –  Nick Holt Jan 17 '13 at 17:04
    
I guess I don't have so many choices. Thanks. –  restricteur Jan 18 '13 at 7:55

If performance is not critical, I could offer a workaround

public class ReplaceLinkedHashMap<K, V> extends LinkedHashMap<K, V> {

    public void replace(K oldKey, K newKey, V newValue) {
        LinkedHashMap<K, V> tmp = new LinkedHashMap<>(this);
        clear();
        for (Entry<K, V> e : tmp.entrySet()) {
            if (e.getKey().equals(oldKey)) {
                put(newKey, newValue);
            } else {
                put(e.getKey(), e.getValue());
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Performance matters, but thanks anyway. –  restricteur Jan 18 '13 at 7:50

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