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Method:

def return_rider_values(pol_option, pro_endorsement, prop_coverage, *par)

  rider_values
  par.each do |p|
    rider_values << RiderValue.find_all_by_rider_id(p)
  end

  rider_hash = { }
  rider_values.each do |rv|
    if rv.attributes["name"].downcase == "yes"
      rider_hash.merge!({par[0].to_s => rv.attributes['id'].to_s})
    elsif rv.attributes["position"] == pol_option.to_i && rv.attributes["rider_id"] == par[1]
      rider_hash.merge!({par[1].to_s => rv.attributes["id"].to_s})
    elsif rv.attributes["position"] == prop_coverage.to_i && rv.attributes["rider_id"] == par[2]
      rider_hash.merge!({par[2].to_s => rv.attributes["id"].to_s})
    elsif rv.attributes["position"] == pro_endorsement.to_i && rv.attributes["rider_id"] == par[3]
      rider_hash.merge!({par[3].to_s => rv.attributes["id"].to_s})
    end
  end
  rider_hash
end

Output looks like this:

rider_hash  #=> '22' -> 58
                '23' -> 61
                '25' -> 66
                '26' -> 68

I was expecting (and need apparently since it's not working later down the line) this:

rider_hash  #=> '22' -> '58'
                '23' -> '61'
                '25' -> '66'
                '26' -> '68'

I don't know why the lookup function later in the program want's the id's to be strings instead of ints. I just know that it does, and I can't change it since lots of other methods use it.

Question: I have to_s on both the hash key and value. I realize that in ruby 1.9 .to_s is an alias for inspect but even on the ruby doc for hashes it says that, inspect or .to_s is supposed to "Return the contents of this hash as a string." So why is only the key being returned as a string?

Edit removed pastie, didn't work.

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2  
I'm wondering, why you use merge! call instead of rider_hash[par[0].to_s] = rv.attributes['id'].to_s? –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 17 '13 at 16:44
1  
Could you make a runnable snippet that reproduces the problem? So far I don't see what could be the problem. –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 17 '13 at 16:47
    
@SergioTulentsev is there a difference? I tend to be more explicit simply because ruby isn't my first language (came from c++/java world) –  ryan Jan 17 '13 at 16:48
    
Well, merge! does the same thing (in this case), but it's not idiomatic. Even Java people would use an indexer, I think. –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 17 '13 at 16:50
    
@SergioTulentsev too me rider_hash[par[0].to_s] = rv.attributes['id'].to_s looks like array[at index par[0].to_string] = some string which seems like your using a string as an index, which is all sorts of bad! –  ryan Jan 17 '13 at 17:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up getting what I wanted by adding this:

rider_hash.each{ |_,v| v.replace "'#{v}'"}

But this seems like a dirty solution somehow.

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Please mark this question as answered. –  Snarf Jan 17 '13 at 21:42

You have an array of hashes so try this:

def return_rider_values
    par = [1,2,3,6]
    rider_hash = {}
    rider_values = [element1: {:attributes => {:id => 1, :name => 'yes', :position => 1, :rider_id => 1}}, 
                    element2: {:attributes => {:id => 2, :name => 'no', :position => 2, :rider_id => 2}},
                    element3: {:attributes => {:id => 3, :name => 'something', :position => 1, :rider_id => 3}}, 
                    element4: {:attributes => {:id => 4, :name => 'something_else', :position => 2,   :rider_id => 6}}]

    rider_values.each_with_index do |hash, idx|
        rider_values[idx].each_pair do |k, v|
            if v[:attributes][:name].downcase == "yes"
                rider_hash.merge!({par[0].to_s => v[:attributes][:id].to_s})

            elsif v[:attributes][:position] == 2 && v[:attributes][:rider_id] == par[1]
                rider_hash.merge!({par[1].to_s => v[:attributes][:id].to_s})

            elsif v[:attributes][:position] == 3 && v[:attributes][:rider_id] == par[2]
                rider_hash.merge!({par[2].to_s => v[:attributes][:id].to_s})

            elsif v[:attributes][:position] == 4 && v[:attributes][:rider_id] == par[3]
                rider_hash.merge!({par[3].to_s => v[:attributes][:id].to_s})

            end
        end
    end
rider_hash
end

test = return_rider_values

puts test

output: #=> {"1"=>"1", "2"=>"2"}

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