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How could the typesafe enum pattern be implemented on a generic class? Let's assume it's implemented along these lines

public class KnownSetting<T>
{
    public readonly static KnownSetting<String> Name = new KnownSetting<String>("name", "Default Name", t => t);
    public readonly static KnownSetting<int> Size = new KnownSetting<String>("size", "25", t => Converter.ToInt32);

    public String Key { get; set; }
    public T DefaultValue { get; set; }
    public Func<String, T> Converter { get; set; }

    private KnownSetting(String key, T defaultValue, Func<String, T> converter)
    {
        Key = key;
        DefaultValue = defaultValue;
        Converter = converter;
    }
}

The implementation of the pattern is correct this way since the constructor remains private, but when using this construct, it looks wrong:

public static class Program
{
    public static void main()
    {
        var x = KnownSetting<?>.Name;
    }
}

Then an option would be to split it in two, KnownSetting container class and the Setting implementation, but then the scope of the constructor cannot be private so as to be instantiated from within the container.

How can this pattern be implemented so that the generics aspect of it stays concealed from the end-user, but remains strongly typed? Is there a more suitable pattern, or is there a better way to implement it?

Update I added a second sample to illustrate that I do want the type of the setting to be generic.

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4  
Your static field has a separate value for each T. You don't want that. –  SLaks Jan 17 '13 at 17:01
    
The best I can think is make the constructor internal and go with your "container class" idea, then you only have to rely on programmers' discipline within the same assembly. –  default.kramer Jan 17 '13 at 17:05
    
@SLaks Why wouldn't I want that? –  Spooles Jan 17 '13 at 17:05
    
@default.kramer Of course you are right that relying on discipline would work, but if I could prevent any error by spending a bit more time on design, it's worth it. –  Spooles Jan 17 '13 at 17:08
1  
@Spooles You wouldn't want that unless KnownSetting<int>.Name != KnownSetting<String>.Name is OK with you. –  mike z Jan 17 '13 at 17:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Create a helper method in the base type that uses another type and create a known settings class. You need the Create method because the base constructor is Setting(string, object, Func). This is also why I introduce another generic variable (U):

public class KnownSetting : Setting<object>
{
    private KnownSetting(string key, object defaultValue, Func<string, object> converter) : base(key, defaultValue, converter) { }

    public readonly static Setting<string> Name = Create<string>("name", "Default Name", t => t);
    public readonly static Setting<int> Size = Create<int>("size", 25, t => Convert.ToInt32(t));
}

public class Setting<T>
{
    public string Key { get; set; }
    public T DefaultValue { get; set; }
    public Func<string, T> Converter { get; set; }

    protected static Setting<U> Create<U>(string key, U defaultValue, Func<string, U> converter)
    {
        return new Setting<U>(key, defaultValue, converter);
    }

    protected Setting(string key, T defaultValue, Func<string, T> converter)
    {
        Key = key;
        DefaultValue = defaultValue;
        Converter = converter;
    }
}
public static class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var x = KnownSetting.Name;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How does this help? Predefined has a private ctor, but unused. Setting here lacks the generic and private ctor wich is the core of the problem. –  Spooles Jan 21 '13 at 22:33
    
You are right, I misunderstood the problem. I changed my solution to reflect the problem; this should be the answer he's looking for. –  atlaste Jan 22 '13 at 8:10
    
If you have the protected Create, why not have the ctor private? –  Spooles Jan 22 '13 at 15:28
    
It has to do with types. The type of the ctor has Setting<T>([...]) so you cannot call the ctor of Setting<not-T> (simply because that's not your base class). In my code this is circumvented by calling Setting<T>.Create<U> - which is in the base class and can therefore call Setting<U> (which is in the same scope). You need inheritance for this to work - so you need some kind of protected ctor. Hope it makes some sense... Just try it - it won't compile :-) –  atlaste Jan 22 '13 at 15:33
    
You are correct indeed. Thanks. –  Spooles Jan 22 '13 at 15:42

Maybe I'm missing something, but why not just use your KnownSetting<T> class as is, and make new references to the same enum instances from a new class? Something like:

public static class KnownSettings {
  public readonly static KnownSetting<string> Name = KnownSetting<string>.Name;
  public readonly static KnownSetting<int> Size = KnownSetting<int>.Size;
  // etc.
}

Then you can use the values as desired:

var x = KnownSettings.Name;
share|improve this answer
    
Because KnownSetting<T> and KnownSetting (no generics) isn't the same class, so the non-generic cannot see the private ctor or the generic one. –  Spooles Jan 22 '13 at 15:24
    
@Spooles: But it doesn't need to see the constructor, it only needs to see the constructed public readonly static field. All KnownSetting<T> values can be constructed entirely internally to KnownSetting<T>, but clients can still access those values through another field on another class. –  Daniel Pryden Jan 22 '13 at 23:22

Declare the static data in a new class:

public class KnownSetting
{
    public readonly static KnownSetting<String> Name = new KnownSetting<String>("name", "Default Name", t => t);
    public readonly static KnownSetting<int> Size = new KnownSetting<String>("size", "25", t => Converter.ToInt32);
}

It can have the same name in C# because class names are unique on name plus generic type argument count.

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1  
Additionally, you can have KnownSetting<T> inherit from KnownSetting, so there's a "generic" non-typed form which you can group them together as if necessary. –  Bobson Jan 17 '13 at 18:36
    
But the constructor of KnownSetting<T> needs to public for this to work. –  default.kramer Jan 17 '13 at 19:41
    
@default.kramer good point. It can be internal, though. –  usr Jan 17 '13 at 19:43
    
@usr It's close. Not perfect, but the best idea so far IMHO. –  Spooles Jan 17 '13 at 19:46
    
@usr As you can see in my solution it can also be protected, thereby hiding it properly. Note that you cannot use a protected ctor directly; you're correct that it has to be internal, which always leaves a nasty taste in my mouth to be honest... –  atlaste Jan 22 '13 at 10:03

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