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array.contains(obj) in JavaScript

What is the best way to find if an object is in an array?

This is the best way I know:

function include(arr, obj) {
    for(var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
        if (arr[i] == obj) return true;
    }
}

include([1,2,3,4], 3); // true
include([1,2,3,4], 6); // undefined
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by casperOne Apr 5 '12 at 19:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    

8 Answers 8

up vote 430 down vote accepted
function include(arr,obj) {
    return (arr.indexOf(obj) != -1);
}

EDIT: This will not work on IE6, 7 or 8 though. The best workaround is to define it yourself if it's not present:

  1. Mozilla's (ECMA-262) version:

      if (!Array.prototype.indexOf)
      {
    
           Array.prototype.indexOf = function(searchElement /*, fromIndex */)
    
        {
    
    
        "use strict";
    
        if (this === void 0 || this === null)
          throw new TypeError();
    
        var t = Object(this);
        var len = t.length >>> 0;
        if (len === 0)
          return -1;
    
        var n = 0;
        if (arguments.length > 0)
        {
          n = Number(arguments[1]);
          if (n !== n)
            n = 0;
          else if (n !== 0 && n !== (1 / 0) && n !== -(1 / 0))
            n = (n > 0 || -1) * Math.floor(Math.abs(n));
        }
    
        if (n >= len)
          return -1;
    
        var k = n >= 0
              ? n
              : Math.max(len - Math.abs(n), 0);
    
        for (; k < len; k++)
        {
          if (k in t && t[k] === searchElement)
            return k;
        }
        return -1;
      };
    
    }
    
  2. Daniel James's version:

    if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
      Array.prototype.indexOf = function (obj, fromIndex) {
        if (fromIndex == null) {
            fromIndex = 0;
        } else if (fromIndex < 0) {
            fromIndex = Math.max(0, this.length + fromIndex);
        }
        for (var i = fromIndex, j = this.length; i < j; i++) {
            if (this[i] === obj)
                return i;
        }
        return -1;
      };
    }
    
  3. roosteronacid's version:

    Array.prototype.hasObject = (
      !Array.indexOf ? function (o)
      {
        var l = this.length + 1;
        while (l -= 1)
        {
            if (this[l - 1] === o)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
      } : function (o)
      {
        return (this.indexOf(o) !== -1);
      }
    );
    
share|improve this answer
    
I'm curious as to why your version of the Mozilla function is so different from the website you're linking to. Did you modify it yourself or is it just an old version or something? –  Shenjoku Mar 11 at 1:16
1  
@Shenjoku: "answered Sep 27 '08 at 15:45" –  Vinko Vrsalovic Mar 11 at 5:49
    
Well, there's my answer haha. I can't tell if there's an older version just by looking at the mozilla website so I wasn't sure. Not that it matters, just a curiosity. In any case this was still helpful so you get an upvote ;) –  Shenjoku Mar 13 at 2:24
    
@mcktimo You actually can delete your own comments - if you mouse over your comment, you will see a small circle with an "X" inside; clicking this will prompt to confirm deletion. –  Jesse Apr 18 at 21:06

If you are using jQuery:

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.inArray/

share|improve this answer

First, implement indexOf in JavaScript for browsers that don't already have it. For example, see Erik Arvidsson's array extras (also, the associated blog post). And then you can use indexOf without worrying about browser support. Here's a slightly optimised version of his indexOf implementation:

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function (obj, fromIndex) {
        if (fromIndex == null) {
            fromIndex = 0;
        } else if (fromIndex < 0) {
            fromIndex = Math.max(0, this.length + fromIndex);
        }
        for (var i = fromIndex, j = this.length; i < j; i++) {
            if (this[i] === obj)
                return i;
        }
        return -1;
    };
}

It's changed to store the length so that it doesn't need to look it up every iteration. But the difference isn't huge. A less general purpose function might be faster:

var include = Array.prototype.indexOf ?
    function(arr, obj) { return arr.indexOf(obj) !== -1; } :
    function(arr, obj) {
        for(var i = -1, j = arr.length; ++i < j;)
            if(arr[i] === obj) return true;
        return false;
    };

I prefer using the standard function and leaving this sort of micro-optimization for when it's really needed. But if you're keen on micro-optimization I adapted the benchmarks that roosterononacid linked to in the comments, to benchmark searching in arrays. They're pretty crude though, a full investigation would test arrays with different types, different lengths and finding objects that occur in different places.

share|improve this answer
    
The code examples you are linking to are slow on large arrays. See the comments in my implementation example of a hasItem() function. –  roosteronacid Sep 27 '08 at 23:06
    
Take a look at these benchmarks: blogs.sun.com/greimer/resource/loop-test.htm For-loops are slow. But I guess the arrays used in the benchmarks are pretty huge :) –  roosteronacid Sep 28 '08 at 11:28
    
Updated my post, using your specialized-function pattern. –  roosteronacid Sep 28 '08 at 11:32
1  
    
I agree. I'm also quite pragmatic. But in the case of optimizing the very basics of the language, I think it's good design to implement functionality as performance-effective as possible. –  roosteronacid Sep 28 '08 at 15:14

If the array is unsorted, there isn't really a better way (aside from using the above-mentioned indexOf, which I think amounts to the same thing). If the array is sorted, you can do a binary search, which works like this:

  1. Pick the middle element of the array.
  2. Is the element you're looking for bigger than the element you picked? If so, you've eliminated the bottom half of the array. If it isn't, you've eliminated the top half.
  3. Pick the middle element of the remaining half of the array, and continue as in step 2, eliminating halves of the remaining array. Eventually you'll either find your element or have no array left to look through.

Binary search runs in time proportional to the logarithm of the length of the array, so it can be much faster than looking at each individual element.

share|improve this answer
1  
You probably should mention that this approach would be faster on large, sorted arrays than small ones. –  roosteronacid Sep 27 '08 at 23:07
8  
why would this be slower on smaller arrays? –  vidstige Aug 22 '11 at 7:54
    
@vidstige: He means it scales well, but isn't necessarily fastest for small inputs. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 11 at 12:53
    
This runs in O(lg n) as opposed to O(n), which is way more scalable –  Edmund Sep 22 at 19:09

assuming .indexOf() is implemented can implement something similar to obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)

Object.defineProperty( Array.prototype,'has',
         {
            value:function(o){return this.indexOf(o)!=-1},
            // writable:false,
            // enumerable:false
         }
   )

now the new method can be used like

[22 ,'a', {prop:'x'}].has(12) 

returning false

share|improve this answer

It depends on your purpose. If you program for the Web, avoid indexOf, it isn't supported by Internet Explorer 6 (lot of them still used!), or do conditional use:

if (yourArray.indexOf !== undefined) result = yourArray.indexOf(target);
else result = customSlowerSearch(yourArray, target);

indexOf is probably coded in native code, so it is faster than anything you can do in JavaScript (except binary search/dichotomy if the array is appropriate). Note: it is a question of taste, but I would do a return false; at the end of your routine, to return a true Boolean...

share|improve this answer
    
ha...I shrill to think there's still an IE6 client out there at this point... –  beauXjames Aug 15 at 16:25

A robust way to check if an object is an array in javascript is detailed here:

Here are two functions from the xa.js framework which I attach to a utils = {} ‘container’. These should help you properly detect arrays.

var utils = {};

/**
 * utils.isArray
 *
 * Best guess if object is an array.
 */
utils.isArray = function(obj) {
     // do an instanceof check first
     if (obj instanceof Array) {
         return true;
     }
     // then check for obvious falses
     if (typeof obj !== 'object') {
         return false;
     }
     if (utils.type(obj) === 'array') {
         return true;
     }
     return false;
 };

/**
 * utils.type
 *
 * Attempt to ascertain actual object type.
 */
utils.type = function(obj) {
    if (obj === null || typeof obj === 'undefined') {
        return String (obj);
    }
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(obj)
        .replace(/\[object ([a-zA-Z]+)\]/, '$1').toLowerCase();
};

If you then want to check if an object is in an array, I would also include this code:

/**
 * Adding hasOwnProperty method if needed.
 */
if (typeof Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty !== 'function') {
    Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty = function (prop) {
        var type = utils.type(this);
        type = type.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + type.substr(1);
        return this[prop] !== undefined
            && this[prop] !== window[type].prototype[prop];
    };
}

And finally this in_array function:

function in_array (needle, haystack, strict) {
    var key;

    if (strict) {
        for (key in haystack) {
            if (!haystack.hasOwnProperty[key]) continue;

            if (haystack[key] === needle) {
                return true;
            }
        }
    } else {
        for (key in haystack) {
            if (!haystack.hasOwnProperty[key]) continue;

            if (haystack[key] == needle) {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
While this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. Also, when you copy/paste the same link-only answer to several very old questions at once, it just looks like spam. –  Bill the Lizard Aug 18 '11 at 12:48
    
Sorry Bill, I really didn't mean it to seem like spam and was just trying to update a few of the old questions about this topic too. I've edited the post here to include the actual answer instead of linking off. –  SkippyChalmers Aug 22 '11 at 7:37
    
@Bill, actually re-reading the question, this doesn't even answer it at all. I must have made a mistake. –  SkippyChalmers Aug 22 '11 at 7:40

Here's some meta-knowledge for you - if you want to know what you can do with an Array, check the documentation - here's the Array page for Mozilla

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array

There you'll see reference to indexOf, added in Javascript 1.6

share|improve this answer
2  
Weird URL for a manual containing information about Javascript 1.8 and beyond! :) –  Vinko Vrsalovic Sep 27 '08 at 15:56
    
this doesnt cover object arrays like the author asked about –  29er May 31 '12 at 6:12
    
@VinkoVrsalovic: the URL has changed to developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/… –  Dan Dascalescu Nov 2 '12 at 2:14

protected by Marc Gravell Dec 24 '10 at 10:35

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