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I believe title says what I want to know. In most cases WCF Service returns NotFound exception, even if I handled exception in Service it returns something blah blah which is hard to realize what was the exact Exception. I want to know Is there any clean and good way to return exact WCF Exception to Silverlight client?

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Do you mean a specific exception or all of them? –  eestein Jan 17 '13 at 17:52
    
Actually specific exception. –  saber Jan 17 '13 at 17:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, this is what you should do:

public App()
{
    ...
    this.UnhandledException += this.Application_UnhandledException;
    ...
}

private void Application_UnhandledException(object sender, 
        ApplicationUnhandledExceptionEventArgs e)
{
    if(e.Exception is YourException){
        //show a message box or whatever you need
        e.Handled = true; //if you don't want to propagate
    }
}

EDIT:

In WPF

public App()
{
    this.Dispatcher.UnhandledException += 
        new System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherUnhandledExceptionEventHandler(
            Dispatcher_UnhandledException);
}

void Dispatcher_UnhandledException(object sender, 
    System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherUnhandledExceptionEventArgs e)
{
    if(e.Exception is YourException){
        //show a message box or whatever you need
        e.Handled = true; //if you don't want to propagate
    }
}

You can check for the error property, as stated here: Best way to catch a WCF exception in Silverlight?

Or you can add a Behavior to your ServiceHost class.

public ServiceHost(Type t, params Uri[] baseAddresses) :
            base(t, baseAddresses) { }

protected override void OnOpening()
{
    base.OnOpening();

    //adding the extra behavior
    this.Description.Behaviors.Add(new ExceptionManager());

You then create a class called ExceptionManager like this:

public sealed class ExceptionManager : IServiceBehavior, IErrorHandler

and then a method called ProvideFault like this:

void IErrorHandler.ProvideFault(Exception error, MessageVersion version, 
    ref Message fault)
{
    if (error == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("error");

    Fault customFault = new Fault();

    customFault.Message = error.Message

    FaultException<Fault> faultException = new FaultException<Fault>(customFault,
        customFault.Message, new FaultCode("SystemFault"));
    MessageFault messageFault = faultException.CreateMessageFault();
    fault = Message.CreateMessage(version, messageFault, faultException.Action);
}

To use ServiceHost:

Create a class ServiceHostFactory:

public class ServiceHostFactory : 
    System.ServiceModel.Activation.ServiceHostFactory
{
    protected override System.ServiceModel.ServiceHost CreateServiceHost(Type t, 
        Uri[] baseAddresses)
    {
        return new ServiceHost(t, baseAddresses);
    }
}

right click your service, select View Markup and add a tag:

Factory="YourNamespace.ServiceHostFactory" 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply, but Exceptions come from Services I don't think this can help to catch WCF Service exceptions. –  saber Jan 17 '13 at 18:09
    
@SaberAmani have you tried? unless you changed or are working with some modified proxy class it should work. –  eestein Jan 17 '13 at 18:11
    
@SaberAmani By the way, I have a running example here for my MVC app using WCF and it works like a charm. My WPF app as well, the only thing I did was change to silverlight tech. –  eestein Jan 17 '13 at 18:12
    
Yes, I tried but it seems it doesn't work. –  saber Jan 17 '13 at 18:12
    
@SaberAmani can you post what you tried or your wcf call? –  eestein Jan 17 '13 at 18:13

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