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This is a simple question that I cant just figure out:

The following code gives the following compilation error:

def parseJson(q: String) = Option[JsValue]{
    try{
            Json.parse(q)
    }catch{
        case e: com.codahale.jerkson.ParsingException => None
    }
}

Error

[error]  found   : None.type (with underlying type object None)
[error]  required: play.api.libs.json.JsValue
[error]             case e: com.codahale.jerkson.ParsingException => None

Why cant I return None considering my response type is Option[JsValue]?

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2  
You may want to consider taking a look at scala.util.{ Try, Success, Failure } in Scala 2.10.0. –  adelbertc Jan 17 '13 at 18:15
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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You actually want to put Json.parse(q) into Some() and not wrapping the whole code in an Option[JsValue] but using it as signature:

def parseJson(q: String): Option[JsValue] = {
    try{
       Some(Json.parse(q))
    }catch{
       case e: com.codahale.jerkson.ParsingException => None
    }
}

But anyway you should prefer using scala.util.control.Exception:

 import scala.util.control.Exception._
 catching(classOf[com.codahale.jerkson.ParsingException]).opt(Json.parse(q))
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Im marking you as correct because the Some() was also missing, but thanks to you both. –  dgrandes Jan 17 '13 at 18:20
    
Curious why he should be using scala.util.control.Exception. What is this class? Never heard of it. –  Dominic Bou-Samra Jan 17 '13 at 22:53
1  
Because it could achieve the same behavior in one line instead of four! and in a -imo- nicer style. Check the scaladoc, there is a good introduction about how to use it :) (link in the response) –  Alois Cochard Jan 18 '13 at 10:08
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I think you just got the syntax for the method definition wrong. The way you wrote it you are calling Option.apply on the result of the try/catch block. I think you meant to write this:

def parseJson(q: String): Option[JsValue] = {
  try {
    Some(Json.parse(q))
  } catch {
    case e: com.codahale.jerkson.ParsingException => None
  }
}
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He did no such thing. Please read carefully. The original method definition doesn't define a return type, but rather tries to call the apply method of the Option companion object. The code that Kim posted correctly defines a return type for the method. –  Ben Kyrlach Jan 17 '13 at 17:48
1  
Indeed, my bad, so used to read ': Option.. ="! I check five times trying to spot the diff without success :-( –  Alois Cochard Jan 17 '13 at 17:56
2  
@BenKyrlach the fact that the OP wrote "Why cant I return None considering my response type is Option[JsValue]?" leads me to think that KimStebel is making the correct assumption –  pagoda_5b Jan 17 '13 at 18:08
1  
Kim is correct, I wanted to define the return type and instead put '='! –  dgrandes Jan 17 '13 at 18:19
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