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I have a pattern to process web service requests using chained partial functions (this is a chain of responsibility pattern, I think?). In my example, let's say there are two parameters for the request, a string Id and a date. There's a verification step involving the id, a verification step checking the date, and finally some business logic that use both. So I have them implemented like so:

object Controller {
  val OK = 200
  val BAD_REQUEST = 400

  type ResponseGenerator = PartialFunction[(String, DateTime), (String, Int)]

  val errorIfInvalidId:ResponseGenerator = {
    case (id, _) if (id == "invalid") => ("Error, Invalid ID!", BAD_REQUEST)
  }

  val errorIfFutureDate:ResponseGenerator = {
    case (_, date) if (date.isAfter(DateTime.now)) => ("Error, date in future!", BAD_REQUEST)
  }

  val businessLogic:ResponseGenerator = {
    case (id, date) => {
      // ... do stuff
      ("Success!", OK)
    }
  }

  def handleRequest(id:String, date:DateTime) = {
    val chained = errorIfInvalidId orElse errorIfFutureDate orElse businessLogic
    val result: (String, Int) = chained(id, date)

    // make some sort of a response out of the message and status code
    // e.g. in the Play framework...
    Status(result._2)(result._1)
  }
}

I like this pattern because it's very expressive - you can easily grasp what the controller method logic is just by looking at the chained functions. And, I can easily mix and match different verification steps for different requests.

The problem is that as I try to expand this pattern it starts to break down. Suppose my next controller takes an id I want to validate, but does not have the date parameter, and maybe it has some new parameter of a third type that does need validation. I don't want to keep expanding that tuple to (String, DateTime, Other) and have to pass in a dummy DateTime or Other. I want to have partial functions that accept different types of arguments (they can still return the same type). But I can't figure out how to compose them.

For a concrete question - suppose the example validator methods are changed to look like this:

val errorIfInvalidId:PartialFunction[String, (String, Int)] = {
  case id if (id == "invalid") => ("Error, Invalid ID!", BAD_REQUEST)
}

val errorIfInvalidDate:PartialFunction[DateTime, (String, Int)] = {
  case date if (date.isAfter(DateTime.now)) => ("Error, date in future!", BAD_REQUEST)
}

Can I still chain them together? It seems like I should be able to map the tuples to them, but I can't figure out how.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'm a big fan of using scalaz's Validation for things like this. It gives you quite a bit of control over what you want to do with errors and how to handle them. Here's an example using you're controller:

import scalaz._
import Scalaz._

object Controller {
  val OK = 200
  val BAD_REQUEST = 400

  case class Response(response: String, status: Int)

  def validateIfInvalidId(id: String) = (id == "invalid") ?
    Response("Error, Invalid ID!", BAD_REQUEST).fail[String] |
    id.success[Response]


  def validateIfFutureDate(date: DateTime, currentDate: DateTime = DateTime.now) = (date.isAfter(currentDate)) ?
    Response("Error, date in future!", BAD_REQUEST).fail[DateTime] |
    date.success[Response]

  def handleRequest(id: String, date: DateTime) = {
    val response = for {
      validatedId <- validateIfInvalidId(id)
      validatedDate <- validateIfFutureDate(date)
    } yield {
      // ... do stuff
      Response("Success!", OK)
    }

    // make some sort of a response out of the message and status code
    // e.g. in the Play framework...
    response.fold(
      failure => Status(failure.response, failure.status),
      success => Status(success.response, success.status)
    )
  }
}

You can move the different validation functions off into their own world and then compose them anytime you want with the for comprehension in scala.

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Thanks, Noah. I haven't used scalaz at all yet, but the validators do look pretty nice. The for comprehension style works well. I'll check them out! –  ryryguy Jan 18 '13 at 17:23

Okay, I found a way to do this which seems not too bad. Originally I was thinking it might work to wrap the "base" version of the partial function in another partial function that takes the tuple. But I couldn't figure out how to do it, until I hit on the obvious-in-retrospect idea of using isDefined in a case guard statement. Like so:

// "base" version
val errorIfInvalidId:PartialFunction[String, (String, Int)] = {
  case id if (id == "invalid") => ("Error, Invalid ID!", BAD_REQUEST)
}

// wrapped to take tuple as parameter
val wrappedErrorIfInvalidId:PartialFunction[(String, DateTime), (String, Int)] = {
  case (id, _) if (errorIfInvalidId.isDefinedAt(id)) => errorIfInvalidId(id)
}

This approach is serviceable, though I still wonder if there isn't a more direct way of accomplishing it. (I also may switch over to the Scalaz validation suggested by Noah after I get a chance to play with it a bit.)

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You can make PartialFunction more generic, making it PartialFunction[Any, (String, Int)] Altho, mb it will be slower. Do not know matching mechanics under PartialFunction

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