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Using Moq with two interfaces,Outer and Inner, I am unable to get Outer.Inner.SomeEvent to fire.

public interface Outer
{
    Inner Inner { get; }
}

public interface Inner
{
    int Prop { get; set; }
    event EventHandler PropChanged;
}

public void Test()
{
    Mock<Outer> omock = new Mock<Outer>();
    Mock<Inner> imock = new Mock<Inner>();

    Console.WriteLine("Inner");
    imock.Object.PropChanged += InnerPropChanged;
    imock.Raise(m => m.PropChanged += null, EventArgs.Empty);
    imock.Object.PropChanged -= InnerPropChanged;

    // This has no effect.
    //omock.Setup(m => m.Inner).Returns(imock.Object);

    Console.WriteLine("Outer");
    // Both the auto recursive and the explicit above produce the same behavior.
    omock.SetupProperty(m => m.Inner.Prop, -1);
    omock.Object.Inner.PropChanged += InnerPropChanged;
    omock.Raise(m => m.Inner.PropChanged += null, EventArgs.Empty);
}

public void InnerPropChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("  InnerPropChanged");
}

Output when calling Test():

Inner
  InnerPropChanged
Outer

How can I alert subscribers to any of Inner's events? Nothing seems to be able to fire them.

Edit - To clarify, I want to be able to raise the Inner event from the Outer context, so the final output should include:

Outer
  InnerPropChanged
share|improve this question
    
Hmmmm, everything looks right :( have you tried omock.SetupProperty(m => m.Inner, imock.Object)? –  Ameen Jan 17 '13 at 19:53
    
Why do you want to raise the event through the Outer. Why don't just just imock.Raise(m => m.PropChanged += null, EventArgs.Empty);? –  nemesv Jan 17 '13 at 20:04
    
@nemesv Because I want Moq to handle the recursive setup without creating explicit Inners. –  wes Jan 17 '13 at 20:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe it's bug or a missing feature that the expression

omock.Raise(m => m.Inner.PropChanged += null, EventArgs.Empty);

is not working... however you can get the generated the Inner mock with Mock.Get and then you can raise the event on it:

public void Test()
{
    Mock<Outer> omock = new Mock<Outer>();
    Console.WriteLine("Outer");
    omock.SetupProperty(m => m.Inner.Prop, -1);
    omock.Object.Inner.PropChanged += InnerPropChanged;
    Mock.Get(omock.Object.Inner)
        .Raise(m => m.PropChanged += null, EventArgs.Empty);
}

Which produces your desired output:

Outer
  InnerPropChanged
share|improve this answer
    
I'm inclined to think it's a bug, considering that the second "events" example in the docs is: mock.Raise(m => m.Child.First.FooEvent += null, new FooEventArgs(fooValue)); ("Raising an event on a descendant down the hierarchy") as per code.google.com/p/moq/wiki/QuickStart#Events –  wes Jan 17 '13 at 21:51
    
+1 saved me typing the same question –  happygilmore Dec 22 '13 at 10:42

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