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I need to make some simple tests in C++ (never done before). I'm working in visual studio 2010 and I've came across the built in test tab. But I really didn't like it and it seems way overcomplicated to me.

All I need is a custom main() method so I could launch quick console app and see if class performs as it should.

I decided to overcome this with preprocessor definitions by creating a wrapper launcher file, which would be the main starting point in program.

So, my main.cpp file contains:

#define DESIRED_TEST "some_test.cpp"

#ifndef DESIRED_TEST
#include "main_program.cpp"
#else
#include DESIRED_TEST
#endif

main_program.cpp is the file which runs the entire program (it has the main method in it). As you see, if I define DESIRED_TEST and assign an include file, main_program.cpp is not included and only the test file is supposed to be built (which also has main method in it). However, when it comes to compiling I get this output:

1>main.obj : error LNK2005: _main already defined in some_test.obj
1>main_program.obj : error LNK2005: _main already defined in some_test.obj
1>C:\....... : fatal error LNK1169: one or more multiply defined symbols found

How should I tell the compiler that the main starting point in program is main.cpp and it should compile and link only according to that file, ignoring multiple definitions in all other object files?


Here's how I overcame this problem (the main.cpp file):

#define DESIRED_TEST "some_test.h"    

#ifndef DESIRED_TEST    

int main(int argc, char *argv[])    
{    
    // main program code here
}    

#else    

#include DESIRED_TEST    

int main() {    
    FUNCTION_CALL();    
}    

#endif

the some_test.h file:

void some_test();
#define FUNCTION_CALL some_test

Now all I need is for every test create new some_test.h and some_test.cpp file and define function call.

The reason I don't want to learn test standart in visual studio is because tests for the project of my level are really simple. I'll probably need to learn it in the future, but I'll learn it when stuff gets really deep and complicated.

share|improve this question
    
.cpp files are conventionally not meant to be #included, so VS is assuming you want them to be built separately regardless of the contents of main.cpp. Trying to undo that is just going to take you further into "this is weird" territory. Why not spend a little more time getting to know the built-in test functionality, and a little less time trying to fight against widely-held development conventions. :) –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Jan 17 '13 at 19:32
    
But "main_program.cpp" is still in your project? (and get compiled separately?) –  qPCR4vir Jan 17 '13 at 19:34
1  
Well, it is perfectly legal to include a .cpp file, it just isn't good style. What including does is nothing but concatenate another file's content with the current file. This does not magically "break" anything, it just isn't pretty and isn't easy to follow. The error that the OP is seeing probably comes from having everything in the project and compiling everything at some point (depending on whether the macro is defined or not) and then rebuilding (not clean), so the linker picks up all definitions, which is a violation of ODR. –  Damon Jan 17 '13 at 19:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

VC treats .cpp files as sources, that should be compiled separately, regrdless of the fact, that they are included somewhere. This is usual behavior and you'd better not try to change it.

Instead, you can

  • Rename your .cpp files to .h or .inc and include header files instead
  • Wrap code inside .cpp in guard like

    //some_test.cpp
    #ifdef DESIRED_TEST 
    
    //code
    
    #endif
    
    
    //main_program.cpp
    #ifndef DESIRED_TEST 
    
    //code 
    
    #endif
    

    Then you should not include .cpps anywhere. DESIRED_TEST can be defined in common header or in project settings.

  • But the best soultion would be to study test framework, provided with Visual Studio and use it.

share|improve this answer
    
You dont need to rename the files. You can just exclude it from the project (in the solution explorer) –  qPCR4vir Jan 17 '13 at 23:23
    
@qPCR4vir, I believe, excluding files from project is a bad idea: you'll lose in clarity, you'll not be able to use project explorer for navigation, for example –  Lol4t0 Jan 18 '13 at 4:59
    
Yes, you are right! I said a simpler idea, not a better one. Anyway, things like IntelliSence, Object Browser, or right-click on the include “instruction” to quick open the file will still work. –  qPCR4vir Jan 18 '13 at 8:36

But "main_program.cpp" is still in your project? (and get compiled separately?)

You have in main.cpp:(main.cpp is in the project)

#define DESIRED_TEST "some_test.cpp"

#ifndef DESIRED_TEST
#include "main_program.cpp"
#else
#include DESIRED_TEST
#endif

Now, simple exclude some_test.cpp and main_program.cpp from the project (in the solution explorer), but dont delete the files! Things like IntelliSence, Object Browser, or right-click on the include “instruction” to quick open the file will still work

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, everything is inside project. –  Vanilla Face Jan 17 '13 at 19:44
    
This new solution could be simple... –  qPCR4vir Jan 17 '13 at 23:20

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