Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One of my client (which has it's own graphic agency -> meaning I must do what they want) gave a though layout to implement see example image:

An example image can be found here: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1857982/grid.gif

I got it to work with an old fashioned table, although I hated myself so much that I'm trying to find an other way around..expecially because I'd like to possibly add some fluid responsive behavior..

I would like to avoid setting display:table-cell and so on, because of lack of support: yes they don't mind using IE7.5 and I can't say "hey update your cr*** browser"

Floating divs don't work because they wouldn't allow me to do that type of grid...

So I was going to ask you: is there any good jquery that helps me on that?

I saw a few of them but I'm not sure (i'm testing) if I can stick perfectly in my container just as the image I attached...

Currently testing: http://www.inwebson.com/jquery/blocksit-js-dynamic-grid-layout-jquery-plugin/ http://www.wookmark.com/jquery-plugin

If anyone has a suggestion or a personal experience I'd really appreciate a feedback, thank you guys!

Luke

share|improve this question
    
How much extra markup are you ok with? Do you expect to have the elements fit together differently for different resolutions? –  cimmanon Jan 17 '13 at 19:43
1  
Perhaps Isotope or Masonry –  Blazemonger Jan 17 '13 at 19:47
    
No problem with extra markup. MMM....for different resolution I think they might expect it to stay as it is but smaller...not like masonry if that's what you're referring to.. –  luke Jan 17 '13 at 19:50
    
link to example image broken –  Robert Siemer Jul 13 '14 at 11:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

different approach, basically just using divs and css with percentages. the html is a bit uglier than i would like, but it is better than tables, and we know something is gonna be ugly in this case

http://jsfiddle.net/sw29M/1/

<div class="wrapper">
<div class="row">
  <div class="column">
    <div class="one item">a</div>
    <div class="two item">b</div>
  </div>
  <div class="column item three">c</div>
  <div class="column">
    <div class="two item">d</div>
    <div class="one item">e</div>
  </div>
</div>
<div class="row">
  <div class="column item double four">a</div>
  <div class="column">
    <div class="two item">b</div>
    <div class="one item">c</div>
  </div>
</div>
<div class="row">
  <div class="column">
    <div class="one item">a</div>
    <div class="five item">b</div>
  </div>
  <div class="column item three">c</div>
  <div class="column">
    <div class="two item">d</div>
    <div class="one item">e</div>
  </div>
</div>
<div class="row">
  <div class="column">
    <div class="two item">a</div>
    <div class="one item">b</div>
  </div>
  <div class="column">
    <div class="one item">a</div>
    <div class="two item">b</div>
  </div>
  <div class="column three item"></div>
</div>
</div>

.one{
 background: #fff;
}
.two{
 background: #222;
}
.three{
 background: #999;
}
.four{
 background: #ccc;
}
.five{
 background: #ddd;
}
.wrapper{
 height: 100px; /*this will define the height of the box*/
}
.row{
 height: 100%;
 width: 100%;
}
.row:after{ /* clearfix */
  content: "";
  display: table;
  clear: both;
}
.row .column{
 width: 33%;
 float: left;
 height: 100%;
}
.row .column.double{
 width: 66%;
}
.row .column .item{
 height: 50%;
 width: 100%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yep this looks pretty good to me, I'll give it a try, I think it should do what I'm looking for...thanks! –  luke Jan 17 '13 at 20:58

I think what you want to use is Masonry

share|improve this answer
    
I did that initially, the problem I had was that Masonry wants to reposition things as I stretch the page...which is something I'm not allowed to do...it would be perfect if it was possible to avoid that, what I need to do is to actually make those box smaller reather than reposition them... –  luke Jan 17 '13 at 20:00
    
Gotcha. Well, I think what you are going to need to do is us relative widths and the css "float" property. I will crate a jsfiddle and post an example. –  Jeffrey Ray Jan 17 '13 at 20:10
    
Well, it might be a bit. I'll check back when I am free and see if someone has provided a solution, and if not I'll take a stab it. –  Jeffrey Ray Jan 17 '13 at 20:25

To be honest, I don't think you'll find an easy way out by using jQuery/css for this particular problem. You could probably make it work with a lot of floating divs if you really don't want to use tables(it is possible, but not that convenient).

IMO and considering the fact that they'll use old browsers, table might just be the right thing to use

share|improve this answer
    
Please don't recommend HTML tables for non-tabular data. The whole point of CSS was to get us away from that sort of thing. –  Blazemonger Jan 17 '13 at 19:50
    
I understand both of you, I'm on your side although (I don't want to start a huge argumentation on that) in this specific case I can't change the design which is given by the comunication agency that follows that company –  luke Jan 17 '13 at 19:53
    
I wouldn't recommend it either but sometimes it just fits in specific situations where the client want something a little crazy and doesnt understand the complication it might bring (I talking about ie6-ie7 complications) ! But I guess you could always try Masonry, it looks pretty decent! –  imbask Jan 17 '13 at 20:06

you can always use absolute positioning, but that would be a very rigid design. something like this perhaps?

.one, .two, .three, .four{
 position: absolute;
 top: 0;
 left: 0;
}

.one, .two{
 width: 200px;
 height: 100px;
}
.two{
 background: #222;
}
.three{
 width: 200px;
 height: 200px;
 background: #666;
}
.four{
 width: 400px;
 height: 200px;
 background: #ccc;
}
.two.location{
 top: 100px;
}
.three.items{
 left: 200px;
}
.one.more{
 top: 100px;
 left: 300px;
}

<div class="one main"></div>
<div class="two location"></div>
<div class="three items"></div>
<div class="one more"></div>
share|improve this answer
    
I considered that, would avoid tables but be absolutely not fluid or responsive...although it would make me feel less dumb for using tables :) –  luke Jan 17 '13 at 19:58
    
you could make it responsive, responsive design just uses different styles for different sizes. however, it would be completely rigid within the constraints of that page size. is the data in each of these sections going to change size regularly? if so, how is the design supposed to respond to that? –  mistersender Jan 17 '13 at 20:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.