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I know how to use malloc() and free() to allocate memory, but is there also a standard C function to check how much memory is left, so I can call that periodically to make sure my code has no memory leaks?

The only thing I can think of is calling malloc(1) in a endless loop until it returns an error, but shouldn't there be a more efficient way?

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Why not just use valgrind on your program to check for leaks? –  Mike Jan 17 '13 at 19:46
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note that calling malloc in an endless loop is likely to never fail since most systems only allocate memory on first touch. –  Ben Jan 17 '13 at 19:46
    
Related : stackoverflow.com/questions/2513505/… –  Faruk Sahin Jan 17 '13 at 19:48
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@Ben: every malloc call reserves part of the virtual address space, so it will eventually return an error. –  larsmans Jan 17 '13 at 19:50
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@larsmans, True, in fact malloc also needs (physical) memory to keep track of the allocated blocs (even if you drop the pointers). So you cannot malloc forever. However, this doesn't help at all to know how much memory is left. –  Ben Jan 17 '13 at 21:01
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3 Answers

No, there's no standard C function to do that. There are some platform-specific functions you can use to perform certain types of queries (like working set size), but those probably won't be helpful, because sometimes memory which has been properly free()d is still considered to be allocated by the OS because the malloc implementation might keep the freed memory around in a pool.

If you want to check for memory leaks, I highly recommend using a tool like Valgrind, which runs your program in a virtual machine of sorts and can track memory leaks, among other features.

If you're running on Windows, you can use _CrtDbgReport and/or _CrtSetDbgFlag to check for memory leaks.

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The program is firmware running on a Cortex M0 CPU, and uses a lot of ARM specific calls/instructions, so I think it would be hard to analyze for Valgrind, and I have barely enough memory on the device to run my own code, let alone to add a virtual machine. –  Muis Jan 17 '13 at 19:56
    
In that case, measure how much memory you have at the start of execution and write wrapper functions around malloc and free to decrement and increment from your start point, as loreb suggests in another answer. –  Alex Reynolds Jan 17 '13 at 21:53
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If you can afford #ifdef'ing a debug version (possibly in an emulator!), you could just build a debug version of malloc/free that keeps track of the number of bytes currently in use, and "print" it periodically (again - only in the debug version, possibly under an emulator) on whatever output device you have for debugging (a led?), and see if it keeps increasing.

The standard trick is to allocate sizeof(size_t) more than requested, thus storing the size together with the newly allocated memory - but if you're writing a firmware I guess you know it already :)

So... do you have an emulator?

EDIT: I'm so used to computers running at GHz that it didn't occur to me at first, but of course another thing you can do is to just count the number of allocations, not their size -- I can't imagine how this could take too much memory to run.

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If in your system malloc() always allocates physical memory, you can call malloc() repeatedly with sizes differing not by 1, but by successive powers of two. That'll be more efficient. Below is an example of how to do it.

If, on the other hand, malloc() only allocates virtual address space without mapping physical memory into it, this won't give you what you want.

Sample code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void* AllocateLargestFreeBlock(size_t* Size)
{
  size_t s0, s1;
  void* p;

  s0 = ~(size_t)0 ^ (~(size_t)0 >> 1);

  while (s0 && (p = malloc(s0)) == NULL)
    s0 >>= 1;

  if (p)
    free(p);

  s1 = s0 >> 1;

  while (s1)
  {
    if ((p = malloc(s0 + s1)) != NULL)
    {
      s0 += s1;
      free(p);
    }
    s1 >>= 1;
  }

  while (s0 && (p = malloc(s0)) == NULL)
    s0 ^= s0 & -s0;

  *Size = s0;
  return p;
}

size_t GetFreeSize(void)
{
  size_t total = 0;
  void* pFirst = NULL;
  void* pLast = NULL;

  for (;;)
  {
    size_t largest;
    void* p = AllocateLargestFreeBlock(&largest);

    if (largest < sizeof(void*))
    {
      if (p != NULL)
        free(p);
      break;
    }

    *(void**)p = NULL;

    total += largest;

    if (pFirst == NULL)
      pFirst = p;

    if (pLast != NULL)
      *(void**)pLast = p;

    pLast = p;
  }

  while (pFirst != NULL)
  {
    void* p = *(void**)pFirst;
    free(pFirst);
    pFirst = p;
  }

  return total;
}

int main(void)
{
  printf("Total free: %zu\n", GetFreeSize());
  printf("Total free: %zu\n", GetFreeSize());
  printf("Total free: %zu\n", GetFreeSize());
  printf("Total free: %zu\n", GetFreeSize());
  printf("Total free: %zu\n", GetFreeSize());
  return 0;
}

Output (ideone):

Total free: 266677120
Total free: 266673024
Total free: 266673024
Total free: 266673024
Total free: 266673024
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