Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

With my shell script, when I run ./Test1 hello result.

It is supposed to take hello as standard input and result as standard output. The shell should remove any whitespace before <td>, </td>, and abc

So, I write the script this way

tr -d [:blank:] < $1
grep -r "<td>" $1 | sed -r 's/<td>//g' > $2
sed -r 's/<\/td>//g' $2
sed -r 's/abc//g' $2

However, when I run this command, the content of result file is exactly the same as the content of hello file (the only difference is the whitespace is removed)

The file hello content:

<td>hello</td>
  <td>hello</td>
    <td>hello</td>
<td>abc</td>
 <td>abc</td>

How do I get sed to apply the change to the target file?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to store the changes from sed back to the file use the -i option:

$ cat file
<head>abc</head>
    <td>hello</td>
      <td>hello</td>
        <td>hello</td>
    <td>abc</td>
     <td>abc</td>
<h1>abc</h1>

$ sed -ni '/<td>/{s/^\s*//;s/abc//;s/<\/\?td>//g;p}' file

$ cat file
hello
hello
hello

Edit: The regexp is clearer if we use a different separator with sed and use the extended regexp option -r:

$ sed -r 's_</?td>__g' file
    hello
      hello
        hello
    abc
     abc

The ? make the previous character optional so the / doesn't have to be present making the regexp match <td> and </td> in one.

share|improve this answer
    
what is <\/\?td>? is it different from <\/td>? –  user1988385 Jan 17 '13 at 20:26
    
additionally, I used grep because hello is an html file, so there's <head> etc, So, I want to find line that contain <td> in the file, delete the <td>, and put it in $2 file. Sorry for the confusion –  user1988385 Jan 17 '13 at 20:37
    
@user1988385 see edit for an explanation of ?. –  iiSeymour Jan 17 '13 at 20:48
    
Also see edit for only matching lines containing <td> replacing the need for grep. –  iiSeymour Jan 17 '13 at 20:54
    
so, do you mean I have to remove that <head> manually? using sed too? At first, I was using grep because it will jump to the line that contain <td> only and put it in the output file. (so, the <head> wont be written to the output file. –  user1988385 Jan 17 '13 at 21:50

If you want sed to edit an existing file in place, you should give -i option to it.

UPD: and it's not clear what you want to do with the result of tr (now it goes to the script's standard output, is it intended?)

share|improve this answer
    
so do you mean I should do something like this: tr -d [:blank:] < $1 > $2 -----> to remove all blank in $1 and put the result in $2? Also, sed -i '....' –  user1988385 Jan 17 '13 at 20:20
    
yes, but look at the answer from @sudo_O for radically improved solution (with everything done in sed). Btw, \/\? stands for "optional slash", that is, either / or nothing, to match both <td> and </td> at once. –  Anton Kovalenko Jan 17 '13 at 20:30

grep solution:

kent$  echo "<td>hello</td>
  <td>hello</td>
    <td>hello</td>
<td>abc</td>
 <td>abc</td>"|grep -v 'abc'|grep -oP '(?<=<td>).*(?=</td>)'                                                                                                                
hello
hello
hello

awk solution:

kent$  echo "<td>hello</td>
  <td>hello</td>
    <td>hello</td>
<td>abc</td>
 <td>abc</td>"|awk -F"</?td>" '!/abc/{print $2}'
hello
hello
hello
share|improve this answer

All you need is 1 simple sed or awk substitution line:

sed -r 's/[[:blank:]]|<\/?td>|abc//g' file
awk '{gsub(/[[:blank:]]|<\/?td>|abc/,"")}1' file

e.g.:

$ cat file
<td>hello</td>
  <td>hello</td>
    <td>hello</td>
<td>abc</td>
 <td>abc</td>

$ sed -r 's/[[:blank:]]|<\/?td>|abc//g' file
hello
hello
hello
share|improve this answer

If you want sed to modify a file you need to pass -e

share|improve this answer
    
Which command do you pass the -e to in order to edit in place? (The answer is 'none of those mentioned in the question', sadly!) The grep command takes -e, but it specifies the regex to be searched for. The sed command takes -e but it specifies (a fragment of) the script. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 17 '13 at 20:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.