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Say I have this variables below ( id , a,b,c,d )

id  a b c d
x   2 4 5 7
y   4 5   9
z     1   2

I want to create a new concatenate variable named 'total' from these strings , so I used this code below :

total = a + ' ' + b + ' ' + c + ' ' + d

Since I don't want all these to be next to each other 2457 , I need one space blank ( ' ' ) between each variables 2 4 5 7, my result look something like this

id  a b c d        total
x   2 4 5 7       2 4 5 7
y   4 5   9       4 5   9
z     1   2         1   2

My problem is .. for example @ y between 5 & 9 , I only want one space instead two Or i want my result to look like this ... can anyone show me how to accomplish this ? In SAS , I can easily use something to compress , not sure how can I do this in python ..

id  a b c d        total
x   2 4 5 7       2 4 5 7
y   4 5   9       4 5 9
z     1   2       1 2

Hopefully I'm not confusing anyone ~ , thanks :-)

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So you basically want to make a table with Python? –  Blender Jan 17 '13 at 20:37
    
IIRC, the equiv. of SAS's compress is re.sub(' +', ' ', s) or possibly ' '.join(some_string.split()) –  Jon Clements Jan 17 '13 at 20:42
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One of the reasons to use join instead of manually concatenating things is that you can do more complex stuff more easily.

First, if you turn your a + ' ' + b + ' ' + c + ' ' + d into a join:

' '.join((a, b, c, d))

That doesn't change anything yet.

2 4 5 7
4 5   9
  1   2

But now, how do we say "all of the non-empty strings in (a, b, c, d)"? Easy:

' '.join(x for x in (a, b, c, d) if x)

So:

2 4 5 7
4 5 9
1 2

That's it.

If the empty values aren't empty strings (or None) but, say, ' ', you need to change the test. For example, maybe:

' '.join(x for x in (a, b, c, d) if x.strip())

If you don't understand generator expressions, all of the following are roughly equivalent, and hopefully you'll understand one:

total = ' '.join(x for x in (a, b, c, d) if x)

total = ' '.join([x for x in (a, b, c, d) if x])

total = ' '.join(filter(bool, (a, b, c, d))

non_zero_values = []
for x in (a, b, c, d):
    if x:
        non_zero_values.append(x)
total = ' '.join(non_zero_values)

In every case, the idea is the same: We have a sequence of 4 values, and we're filtering it down to a sequence of 0 to 4 values by keeping only the ones that aren't empty.

If we stuck with your explicit concatenation, this is still possible, it's just much harder and uglier:

((a + ' ') if a else '' +
 (b + ' ') if b else '' +
 (c + ' ') if c else '' +
  d if d else '')

Which again gives you:

2 4 5 7
4 5 9
1 2
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Great! This is awesome thank you!!! –  JPC Jan 18 '13 at 4:00
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Assuming your table data is in a list or tuple where each row has the id value as its first column and the value for a given column in a row is None if it is empty:

totals = [' '.join(value for value in row[1:] if value is not None) for row in data]

Alternatively, you could put it in a dict, which might be more useful depending upon how you use it later.

data = {'x' : {'values' : (2, 4, 5, 7)},
        'y' : {'values' : (4, 5, None, 9)},
        'z' : {'values' : (None, 1, None, 2)}}
for data_set in data.values():
    data_set['total'] = ' '.join(value for value in data_set['values'] if value is not None)
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