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Suppose I have a Javascript object (the curly braces indicate it is so):

{
   a: function (something) {
      return something*2;
   },
   b: function () {
      var c = this.a(2);      //Does not work. Why?
      return c;
   }
}

What is the workaround to this?

share|improve this question
    
This should work. How are you calling b? –  Jan Dvorak Jan 17 '13 at 21:02
4  
The value of this is entirely dependent on how you are calling b() and cannot be answered otherwise. –  Mathletics Jan 17 '13 at 21:06
    
Mathletics is correct. I was calling a from another function within b, which affects "this". The trick is to save "this" before entering that function within b. –  bibo bode Jan 17 '13 at 21:13
    
Voted to close as not a real question. –  Mathletics Jan 17 '13 at 21:15
    
Mathletics, I asked this question after searching around SO for an hour. I'm sure it will help someone else out. –  bibo bode Jan 17 '13 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It not work because when you access the method b it context isn't the instance from object that you made, it will try to search in the binded context or in window object.

var x = {
   a: function (something) {
      return something*2;
   },
   b: function () {
      var c = x.a(2);      //Does not work. Why?
      return c;
   }
}

This way you are using the x as context to access the method a.

Or you can use a new operator to create your object and the method as it prototype or direct method.

When you do it, the result will be:

var x = function() {
    return {
       a: function (something) {
          return something*2;
       },
       b: function () {
          var c = this.a(2);      //Does not work. Why?
          return c;
       }
    }
}

It will make you lose the prototype from x, when you make a new instance, but your code will work.

Example:

var y = new x();
console.log(y.b());
share|improve this answer
    
I thought x = was implied on the question. If not, how could the OP possibly be calling b? –  bfavaretto Jan 17 '13 at 21:07
    
yes, x is inside b method context. I did just put there for an example of use. This way you cant make it won't work using x.b.apply(window); for example. –  Gabriel Gartz Jan 17 '13 at 21:13

It works for me, you were missing a coma after a declaration.

{
   a: function (something) {
      return something*2;
   }, // -> this one
   b: function () {
      var c = this.a(2);
      return c;
   }
}

If you call b the function should return a(2) which is 2*2=4

alert(p.b());

http://jsfiddle.net/PNbXj/

share|improve this answer
    
Just a syntax error :) (I typed it manually and was wondering what was wrong, good find) –  jholloman Jan 17 '13 at 21:04

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