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I'm particularly curious about LLVM 4.1, but would be interested in other compilers' behavior as well.

According to the GCC documentation (which LLVM supports at least in part), the unused attribute has the following behavior:

This attribute, attached to a variable, means that the variable is meant to be possibly unused. GCC will not produce a warning for this variable. 

If the compiler is able to warn you about unused parameters and variables, though, presumably it already knows what parameters and variables are unused without you having to tell it (especially since the unused attribute only indicates that the variable is possibly unused). Therefore, does the unused attribute allow the compiler to perform any additional optimizations, or is its purpose just to allow for more readable code? Also, if the unused attribute does in fact allow the compiler to perform additional optimizations, what happens if you actually end up using a parameter or variable that was specified as unused? LLVM (in XCode) did not seem to complain about this case, though it's possible I wasn't compiling at the right optimization level or with the right warnings enabled.

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Note that LLVM (clang) is a separate compiler, which accepts some of the GCC flags for compatibily with the de-facto standard. –  vonbrand Jan 20 '13 at 0:26
    
Yep, changed some of the wording in my original post to make that clearer. –  mon4goos Jan 29 '13 at 20:27
    
@Joe, Do you mean that any edits should be a comment? –  mon4goos Mar 21 '13 at 19:35
    
@mon4goos That comment belonged to a now deleted answer and when it was deleted it moved it up to the question so it is out of context. Good question by the way. –  Joe Mar 21 '13 at 20:55
    
@Joe Thanks! Out of curiosity, how were you able to figure that out? –  mon4goos Mar 22 '13 at 0:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

__attribute__((unused)) doesn't help optimization, and it doesn't mean that the value is necessarily unused. It suppresses warning (if there is a reason for this warning, that is, if the value is indeed unused), that's all.

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One use for it is on constants in headers that are used in some compilation units, and not in others - otherwise you get some useless warnings. –  Michael Anderson Sep 26 '13 at 4:09

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