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I want to use socket.io in AngularJS. I found the following factory:

app.factory('socket', function ($rootScope) {
    var socket = io.connect();
    return {
        on: function (eventName, callback) {
            socket.on(eventName, function () {
                var args = arguments;
                $rootScope.$apply(function () {
                    callback.apply(socket, args);
                });
            });
        },
        emit: function (eventName, data, callback) {
            socket.emit(eventName, data, function () {
                var args = arguments;
                $rootScope.$apply(function () {
                    if (callback) {
                        callback.apply(socket, args);
                    }
                });
            })
        }
    };

and it is used in the controller like:

function MyCtrl($scope, socket) {
    socket.on('message', function(data) {
        ...
    });
};

the problem is that each time the controller is visited another listener is added, so when a message is received it is handled multiple times.

what can be a better strategy to integrate socket.io with AngularJS ?

EDIT: I know that I can return nothing in the factory and do the listening there, then use $rootScope.$broadcast and $scope.$on in the controllers, but it doesn't look like a good solution.

EDIT2: added to the factory

init: function() {
            socket.removeAllListeners();
}

and call it at the beginning of each controller that use socket.io.

still doesn't feel like the best solution.

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Remove the socket listeners whenever the controller is destroyed. You will need to bind the $destroy event like this:

function MyCtrl($scope, socket) {
    socket.on('message', function(data) {
        ...
    });

    $scope.$on('$destroy', function (event) {
        socket.removeAllListeners();
        // or something like
        // socket.removeListener(this);
    });
};

For more information check the angularjs documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
I accepted your answer, its the most simple one suggested. –  Gal Ben-Haim Jan 18 '13 at 11:07
    
Error: socket.removeListeners is not a function –  waqas Dec 5 '13 at 4:02
    
@waqas You have to encapsulate socket into a service. –  Parker Feb 12 at 21:50
    
I just figured out a good solution to this issue. Check out my answer below. –  Jason Jun 6 at 21:00

You might be able to handle this with a minimal amount of work by wrapping up a Scope and watching for $destroy to be broadcast, and when it is, only removing from the socket the listeners that were added in the context of that Scope. Be warned: what follows hasn't been tested--I'd treat it more like pseudocode than actual code. :)

// A ScopedSocket is an object that provides `on` and `emit` methods,
// but keeps track of all listeners it registers on the socket.
// A call to `removeAllListeners` will remove all listeners on the
// socket that were created via this particular instance of ScopedSocket.

var ScopedSocket = function(socket, $rootScope) {
  this.socket = socket;
  this.$rootScope = $rootScope;
  this.listeners = [];
};

ScopedSocket.prototype.removeAllListeners = function() {
  // Remove each of the stored listeners
  for(var i = 0; i < this.listeners.length; i++) {
    var details = this.listeners[i];
    this.socket.removeListener(details.event, details.fn);
  };
};

ScopedSocket.prototype.on = function(event, callback) {
  var socket = this.socket;
  var $rootScope = this.$rootScope;

  var wrappedCallback = function() {
    var args = arguments;
    $rootScope.$apply(function() {
      callback.apply(socket, args);
    });
  };

  // Store the event name and callback so we can remove it later
  this.listeners.push({event: event, fn: wrappedCallback});

  socket.on(event, wrappedCallback);
};

ScopedSocket.prototype.emit = function(event, data, callback) {
  var socket = this.socket;
  var $rootScope = this.$rootScope;

  socket.emit(event, data, function() {
    var args = arguments;
    $rootScope.$apply(function() {
      if (callback) {
        callback.apply(socket, args);
      }
    });
  });
};

app.factory('Socket', function($rootScope) {
  var socket = io.connect();

  // When injected into controllers, etc., Socket is a function
  // that takes a Scope and returns a ScopedSocket wrapping the
  // global Socket.IO `socket` object. When the scope is destroyed,
  // it will call `removeAllListeners` on that ScopedSocket.
  return function(scope) {
    var scopedSocket = new ScopedSocket(socket, $rootScope);
    scope.$on('$destroy', function() {
      scopedSocket.removeAllListeners();
    });
    return scopedSocket;
  };
});

function MyController($scope, Socket) {
  var socket = Socket($scope);

  socket.on('message', function(data) {
     ...
  });
};
share|improve this answer
    
do you use this object directly in a controller ? –  Gal Ben-Haim Jan 18 '13 at 22:13
1  
At the bottom of the example, you can see the Socket service being injected into a controller, and an example of how you would go about using it. Does that answer your question, or do you mean something else? –  Brandon Tilley Jan 19 '13 at 0:08
    
thanks, it does –  Gal Ben-Haim Jan 19 '13 at 7:40
    
I've been grappling with the same problem and I wonder if the simpler approach is to hoist all the socket.on calls to be on $rootScope. In my case, incoming socket.io events affect the ng-view, so moving them to be on $rootScope prevents (I think) the problem @GalBen-Haim faced. One problem with this approach is that those pieces of your model that are modified by incoming socket.io messages need to also be in the $rootScope. For now, I prefer doing this and keeping the solution simple. Injecting $rootScope into the other controllers allows them to directly access the necessary model parts. –  Ram Rajamony May 9 '13 at 19:43
1  
@ManuelAráoz I'm sure there are issues with the code listed--that's why it says: "Be warned: what follows hasn't been tested--I'd treat it more like pseudocode than actual code." :) Please feel free to edit with updates. (Edit) I've updated the code. –  Brandon Tilley Jan 20 at 17:05

I would add a comment to the accepted answer, but i can't. So, i'll write a reply. I had the same problem and the easiest and simplest answer i found is the one that you can find here, on another post, provided by michaeljoser.

I'll copy it below for convenience:

You have to add removeAllListeners to your factory (see below) and have the following code in each of your controllers:

$scope.$on('$destroy', function (event) {
socket.removeAllListeners();
});

Updated socket factory:

var socket = io.connect('url');
    return {
        on: function (eventName, callback) {
            socket.on(eventName, function () {
                var args = arguments;
                $rootScope.$apply(function () {
                    callback.apply(socket, args);
                });
            });
        },
        emit: function (eventName, data, callback) {
            socket.emit(eventName, data, function () {
                var args = arguments;
                $rootScope.$apply(function () {
                    if (callback) {
                        callback.apply(socket, args);
                    }
                });
            })
        },
      removeAllListeners: function (eventName, callback) {
          socket.removeAllListeners(eventName, function() {
              var args = arguments;
              $rootScope.$apply(function () {
                callback.apply(socket, args);
              });
          }); 
      }
    };
});

It saved my day, i hope it will be useful to someone else!

share|improve this answer

Instead of doing app.factory, create a service (singleton) like so:

var service = angular.module('socketService', []);
service.factory('$socket', function() {
    // Your factory logic
});

You can then simply inject the service to your app and use it in controllers as you would $rootScope.

Here is a more complete example of how I have this set up:

// App module
var app = angular.module('app', ['app.services']);

// services
var services = angular.module('app.services', []);

// Socket service
services.factory('$socket', ['$rootScope', function(rootScope) {

    // Factory logic here

}]);

// Controller
app.controller('someController', ['$scope', '$socket', function(scope, socket) {

    // Controller logic here

}]);
share|improve this answer
1  
what's the difference between this and my solution ? –  Gal Ben-Haim Jan 17 '13 at 23:24
1  
Read the first line! A service is created only ones (singleton), so doing a io.connect in a service would create only one listener. I can confirm that this works. –  Wim Jan 18 '13 at 8:37
12  
This is not correct at all. ALL service in Angular are singletons. Here is proof. Calling app.service vs app.factory, etc. simply differs in the way the service is constructed (e.g. use factory if only $get is required in your service). The issue in this question is not creating multiple connections to Socket.IO, but the fact that listeners are not destroyed when a Controller (and its Scope) are destroyed. –  Brandon Tilley Jan 18 '13 at 17:28

Expanding on Brandon's answer above, I've created a service that should additionally 1) strip angular tags like .$$hashKey that gets left on elements, and 2) allows for namespaced sockets like socketsof('..').on('..'

(function (window, app, undefined) {
    'use strict';


    var ScopedSocket = function (socket, $rootScope) {
        this.socket = socket;
        this.$rootScope = $rootScope;
        this.listeners = [];
        this.childSockets = [];
    };

    ScopedSocket.prototype.removeAllListeners = function () {
        var i;

        for (i = 0; i < this.listeners.length; i++) {
            var details = this.listeners[i];
            this.socket.removeListener(details.event, details.fn);
        }

        for (i = 0; i < this.childSockets.length; i++) {
            this.childSockets[i].removeAllListeners();
        }
    };

    ScopedSocket.prototype.on = function (event, callback) {
        var socket = this.socket;
        var $rootScope = this.$rootScope;

        this.listeners.push({event: event, fn: callback});

        socket.on(event, function () {
            var args = arguments;
            $rootScope.$apply(function () {
                callback.apply(socket, args);
            });
        });
    };

    ScopedSocket.prototype.emit = function (event, data, callback) {
        var socket = this.socket;
        var $rootScope = this.$rootScope;

        socket.emit(event, angular.fromJson(angular.toJson(data)), function () {
            var args = arguments;
            $rootScope.$apply(function () {
                if (callback) {
                    callback.apply(socket, args);
                }
            });
        });
    };

    ScopedSocket.prototype.of = function (channel) {
        var childSocket = new ScopedSocket(this.socket.of(channel), this.$rootScope);

        this.childSockets.push(childSocket);

        return childSocket;
    };


    app.factory('Socket', ['$rootScope', function ($rootScope) {
        var socket = $rootScope.socket;

        return function(scope) {
            var scopedSocket = new ScopedSocket(socket, $rootScope);
            scope.$on('$destroy', function() {
                scopedSocket.removeAllListeners();
            });
            return scopedSocket;
        };
    }]);
})(window, window.app);
share|improve this answer

I use something like the code below. socketsService is only instantiated once and I believe Angular takes care of GC the $on's

If you don't like $broadcast/$on, there are some slightly more solid Message Bus implementations for Angular available...

app.service('socketsService', ['$rootScope', function ($rootScope) {
    var socket = window.io.connect();

    socket.on('info', function(data) {
        $rootScope.$broadcast("info_received", data);
    });

    socket.emit('ready', "Hello");
}]);

app.controller("infoController",['$scope',
    function ($scope) {
        $scope.$root.$on("info_received", function(e,data){
            console.log(data);
        });
        //...
    }]);

app.run(
    ['socketsService',
        function (socketsService) {
        //...
    }]);
share|improve this answer

I just solved a similar problem before I read this. I did it all in the Service.

.controller('AlertCtrl', ["$scope", "$rootScope", "Socket", function($scope, $rootScope, Socket) {
    $scope.Socket = Socket;
}])

// this is where the alerts are received and passed to the controller then to the view
.factory('Socket', ["$rootScope", function($rootScope) {
    var Socket = {
        alerts: [],
        url: location.protocol+'//'+location.hostname+(location.port ? ':'+location.port: ''),
        // io is coming from socket.io.js which is coming from Node.js
        socket: io.connect(this.url),
        testMsg: function(msg) {
            console.log(msg);
        }
    };
    // set up the listener once
    // having this in the controller was creating a
    // new listener every time the contoller ran/view loaded
    // has to run after Socket is created since it refers to itself
    (function() {
        Socket.socket.on('get msg', function(data) {
            if (data.alert) {
                Socket.alerts.push(data.alert);
                $rootScope.$digest();
            }
        });
    }());
    return Socket;
}])
share|improve this answer

I solved this problem by checking whether listener already exists. If you have multiple controllers that are all loaded at the same time (think of different page modules that all utilize socketIO), removing all registered listeners on $destroy would break the functionality of both the destroyed controller and all the controllers that are still loaded.

app.factory("SocketIoFactory", function ($rootScope) {
    var socket = null;
    var nodePath = "http://localhost:12345/";

    function listenerExists(eventName) {
        return socket.hasOwnProperty("$events") && socket.$events.hasOwnProperty(eventName);
    }

    return {
        connect: function () {
            socket = io.connect(nodePath);
        },
        connected: function () {
            return socket != null;
        },
        on: function (eventName, callback) {
            if (!listenerExists(eventName)) {
                socket.on(eventName, function () {
                    var args = arguments;
                    $rootScope.$apply(function () {
                        callback.apply(socket, args);
                    });
                });
            }
        },
        emit: function (eventName, data, callback) {
            socket.emit(eventName, data, function () {
                var args = arguments;
                $rootScope.$apply(function () {
                    if (callback) {
                        callback.apply(socket, args);
                    }
                });
            })
        }
    };
});

This could be further improved by tracking which listeners were registered by which controller and removing only listeners that belong to destroyed controllers to clean up the memory.

share|improve this answer

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