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have a look at the code below once and help me out by clarifying my doubts. I have commented my doubts on each lines where i have doubts. Moreover, its a part of code from a huge one. so please ignore the variable declarations and all.

The whole code is working perfect and no errors while compiled.

double Graph::Dijkstra( path_t& path )
{
    int* paths = new int[_size];
    double min = dijkstra(paths); // **is a function call or not? bcz i didn't found any function in the code**
   if(min < 0) { delete[] paths; return -1;}


    int i = _size - 1;  
    while(i>=0)
    {       
        path.push(i);   // **when will the program come out of this while loop, i'm wondering how does it breaks?** 
        i=paths[i];         
    }

    path.push(0); 

    delete[] paths;
    return min;
}

Full coding is available here.

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thanks for that –  NRK Jan 18 '13 at 13:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
 double min = dijkstra(paths); // **is a function call or not? bcz i didn't found any function in the code**

It almost certainly is. However, it could be a free function, member function, function invoked by a macro, or something else. Without seeing the rest of the code, we can only guess.

while(i>=0)
{       
    path.push(i);   // **when will the program come out of this while loop, i'm wondering how does it breaks?** 
    i=paths[i];         
}

The program will come out of the loop as a soon as i is less than zero. If I had to guess, I'd say the each node in the path contains a link to the previous node's index with the last node in a path returning -1 or some other negative number.

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thanks. How does a function invoked by a macro? can u just give a example of how it would be. here is the full code. if you can clear what it is, it would be great. read.pudn.com/downloads155/sourcecode/others/689480/ksp/… –  NRK Jan 18 '13 at 10:40
    
@NRK: Say you have #define foo(x) (bar(x)->baz()) somewhere. Now somewhere else, you see foo(2). So you decide to search for a function called foo, but there is no function called foo -- other functions, bar and baz are invoked by a macro. –  David Schwartz Jan 18 '13 at 11:04
    
aha thats clear about the macro now. thanks for ur help. Then it doesn't seem like macro invokation here in my problem. can you have a look at it, if you had some time. –  NRK Jan 18 '13 at 11:33
    
It's a function call. The function it's calling starts at line 305. –  David Schwartz Jan 18 '13 at 13:18
    
But, the function in line 305 has 3 parameters and the above has only one parameter right. is it possible so ? –  NRK Jan 18 '13 at 13:40

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