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I'm starting to make use of static code analysis to find memory management problems in my code. I've found it very useful, but there are a couple of bits of code I've written that I'm sure aren't causing memory leaks (instruments doesn't report any) but are being reported by the analyser. I think it's a question of me writing the code in a non-friendly manner. Here's an example

for (glyphUnit *ellipsisDot in ellipsisArray) {
    CGPathRef newDot = CGPathCreateCopyByTransformingPath(ellipsisDot.glyphPath, &ellipsisTransform);
    CGPathRelease(ellipsisDot.glyphPath);  // Incorrect decrement of the reference count of an object that is not owned at this point by the caller
    ellipsisDot.glyphPath = newDot;
}        

where glyphUnit is a simple custom class that has a GCPathRef as a property, which the custom class releases in its dealloc method. So in this loop I'm transforming the path and storing it in anewDot then releasing the original glyphPath so I can assign the newly created one to it. I can see how this is getting the code analyser confused, with it giving a message I'm decrementing an object I don't own. Is there another way swap in the new path without confusing it?

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2 Answers 2

It should be,

for (glyphUnit *ellipsisDot in ellipsisArray) {
    CGPathRef newDot = CGPathCreateCopyByTransformingPath(ellipsisDot.glyphPath, &ellipsisTransform);
    ellipsisDot.glyphPath = newDot;
    CGPathRelease(newDot); 
} 

You are creating newDot by doing CG CreateCopy operation and you need to do release on that variable. So the analyser is warning that you dont own ellipsisDot.glyphPath param to release it. You are trying to release the wrong param here. When you put that release statement in the second line as in question, ellipsisDot.glyphPath and newDot are pointing to two separate instances. Only on the third line, you were assigning newDot to ellipsisDot.glyphPath.

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1  
This code is right, but only if the glyphUnit class does the correct memory management in it’s setGlyphPath: accessor method. If the glyphPath property is declared as assign (which I assume because the code apparently is working) this code would work OK. –  Sven Jan 17 '13 at 22:47
    
I am not sure about that since he is using CGPathRelease(ellipsisDot.glyphPath); before the third line. –  iDev Jan 17 '13 at 22:53
    
@Sven you are correct, I was using `assign so it was working and I didn't have an appropriate setter method. Using ARC in the object world had made me forget about accessor methods. @ACB thanks for your response, I'll add an answer summarising my mistake. –  user524261 Jan 18 '13 at 22:38
1  
@user524261, So didnt the above answer fix it? Ideally your issue in question should be fixed after this change. And you need to modify the assign statements wherever required. –  iDev Jan 18 '13 at 22:40
1  
In that case if it was helpful, could you please accept it? Thanks. –  iDev Jan 22 '13 at 18:51

It turns out that I forgot about defining setters in my custom glyphUnit class. Being in the ARC world for objects and used to synthesizing my methods I had forgotten the need to manage my retain counts for core foundation references. I had been releasing glyphPath in my dealloc, but was not using a setter method. As @Sven suspected, I was simply using a synthesized assign and making up for my lack of setter method by doing some less than intuitive releases in my code snippet above. I've now added a setter method as below to glyphUnit

- (void)setGlyphPath:(CGPathRef)newPath
{
    if (_glyphPath != newPath)
    {
        CGPathRelease(_glyphPath);
        _glyphPath = CGPathRetain(newPath);
    }
}

After adding this, I now had the necessary retain in place to change my code snippet to the one @ACB described and my code ran nicely (without it, it obviously caused an EXC_BAD_ACCESS).

Kudos to @Sven for inferring my mistake and setting me in the right direction... no pun intended.

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