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I want to show my investigation:

Heap

dynamic allocation (malloc/mmap) of 1GB

$top

virtual memory 1GB resident memory ~ 0

memset 1GB

$top

virtual memory 1GB resident memory 1GB

deallocate (free/munmap) of 1GB

$top

virtual memory 1GB resident memory ~ 0

Stack

dynamic allocation (alloca/local data structure) of 1GB

$top

virtual memory 1GB resident memory ~ 0

memset 1GB

$top

virtual memory 1GB resident memory 1GB

deallocate (stack unwind) of 1GB

$top

virtual memory 1GB resident memory 1GB !!!???

Why when the stack unwind the resident memory (physical pages are still in use), The heap segment allocation is done with mmap and the stack segment allocation is done with mmap - so why there is difference in the behavior of reclaim?

THANKS!

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There are two resources: the address space, and the attached pages. The stack can only increase (grow down in most cases) but will never schrink back; there just has been a high-water mark put there. Physical pages may disappear, but the addres space will be (IIRC) probably never be recalimed. Once you push the stack limit towards the heap, it will never be retracted. – wildplasser Jan 18 '13 at 0:08

Because the OS thinks that once you have use that much stack, you probably will do that again. The OS can't really know [from outside your application] what your application is about to do in the future. It would be rather difficult to figure out when it's OK to free some of the stack, and you get all sorts of interesting race-conditions in the OS where you have to stop the application from running simply to reduce it's stack - and then it suddenly needs it again, so it needs to be allocated.

Using mmap, on the other hand, there is a distinct munmap to tell the OS "I have no interest in this memory". So it gets freed then and there [as part of the munmap call itself - specifically, in zap_pte_range the pages themselves are freed and given back to the OS.

It shouldn't really be a big issue, unless the following conditions are fulfilled: 1. You are running on an embedded system that doesn't have swap. 2. Your application runs for a long period of time after it has returned for using a lot of stack (assuming you actually do need this much memory as stack, you will have to have that memory available WHEN it's needed, so it's obviously only a problem if the application then doesn't need the stack later on and that period is long - whatever your definition of long is). 3. Your system doesn't have enough RAM to fulful other RAM needs in other applications.

The reason I say that is that although the stack is using that much memory, if the application isn't using the ram for a long time, and the system is running low on memory, it will swap it out to disk - to be swapped in at a later stage IF it's needed.

I would also say that using such large amounts of stackspace is generally considered a bad idea. Running out of space on stack [either hitting the limit or "there just isn't enough memory available"] is nearly always fatal.

So whilst I often suggest using stack-space to store temporary variables, I think 1GB of stack is quite excessive. A few megabytes should be acceptable, but hundreds of megabytes or more is probably a sign of "you should probably store things in another way".

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