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Let's have a function func which allocates memory for vec. Also let's func is called many times in a loop.

void func ()
{
    std::vector<int> vec;
    vec.resize(someNumber);
}

for (int i=0; i<someNumber; ++i)
{
    func ();
}

How I can allocate memory for vec only once in a loop?

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3  
Are you familiar with the static keyword? –  Beta Jan 17 '13 at 23:36
2  
@Jon: The memory allocated for storage of the vector's contents is on the heap, not the stack. –  cdhowie Jan 17 '13 at 23:41
2  
Both "heap" and "stack" are wrong terms when talking about C++. Correct terms are "dynamic" and "automatic" storage. –  Griwes Jan 17 '13 at 23:41
2  
@Griwes Not at all -- they are still completely relevant. –  cdhowie Jan 17 '13 at 23:42
3  
@shibli You need to tell us a little more about why you want do this and what else you are doing with the vector inside func(). What are you concerned about? –  JaredC Jan 17 '13 at 23:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As Beta said, every time the function func() is called a new vector is created and is destroyed when the function exits. If you want to have a single vector which gets resized which each call, you may want to do something like

std::vector<int> vec;
for (int i=0; i<someNumber; ++i)
{
    vec.resize(i);
}

or you can direcly initialise your vector with the max memory you will need as

std::vector<int> vec(someNumber);
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There are two possible solutions I can see. One is to have the function take a reference to an std::vector<int> that it can use.

void func (std::vector<int> & vec)
{
    vec.resize(someNumber);
}

Another possibility is to create a functor that uses a private vector, and can therefore reuse the allocation, assuming it is called multiple times.

class SomeFunctor
{
public:
    void operator()();

private:
    std::vector<int> vec;
}

void SomeFunctor::operator()()
{
    vec.resize(someNumber);
}

This can be used like this:

SomeFunctor func;

for (int i=0; i<someNumber; ++i)
{
    func ();
}

Note that calling resize() on the vector means that the vector will allocate new storage for the existing elements, copy the existing elements over, and deallocate the old storage. This defeats the entire purpose of holding onto a vector object, as the vector's internal allocation will never be reused! Consider using reserve() instead, which will never shrink (but may enlarge) the allocation.

The optimal solution might be none of these approaches, but something far simpler. Your example code has not given enough detail to know if these approaches will be beneficial.


As a side note, remember that premature optimization is a bad thing. Code first, then run a profiler and see where the bottlenecks are -- usually they will be around collecting user input or other things like network and disk I/O. I'm not saying that you shouldn't try to predict possible bottlenecks and engineer around them, but don't excessively worry about every possible function call and allocation/deallocation.

If this is a working application and not a prototype, run a profiler. You are very likely to find that any bottlenecks lie elsewhere.

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2  
That's not true- it won't resize if it already holds enough elements. –  Puppy Jan 18 '13 at 0:02
    
@DeadMG If it holds exactly the same number, yes. In all other cases it will reallocate. –  cdhowie Jan 18 '13 at 18:48

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