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I hope I'm using the correct terminology, if not, please comment and I'll correct.


#1: Works

Instantiate before class declaration

$x = new Abc;

class Abc {
    // code
}


#2: Doesn't Work

Instantiate before child class declaration (child declared before parent)

$x = new Xyz

class Xyz extends Abc {
    // code
}

class Abc {
    // code
}


#3: Works

Instantiate before child class declaration (child declared after parent)

$x = new Xyz

class Abc {
    // code
}

class Xyz extends Abc {
    // code
}


#4: Works

Instantiate after child class declaration (child declared before parent)

class Xyz extends Abc {
    // code
}

$x = new Xyz

class Abc {
    // code
}


Edit

The following quote is from an answer below by @artsylar. I don't know if my shared host has autoloading enabled, but I can't wrap my head around that quote in relation to the examples I've listed.

Note:

Unless autoloading is used, then classes must be defined before they are used. If a class extends another, then the parent class must be declared before the child class structure. This rule applies to classes that inherit other classes and interfaces.

share|improve this question
    
And where is the Abc class in the second example? You have to include this class first. –  bitWorking Jan 18 '13 at 0:19
    
@redreggae I edited my Question to show more details. –  akTed Jan 18 '13 at 0:23
    
Autoloading only affects scenarios where the classes are defined in separate files, where you would need an autoloader to automatically include the source files. It wouldn't make a difference when the classes are defined in a single file. –  cmbuckley Jan 19 '13 at 13:05

1 Answer 1

I think this link can help you. http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.inheritance.php

Note:

Unless autoloading is used, then classes must be defined before they are used. If a class extends another, then the parent class must be declared before the child class structure. This rule applies to classes that inherit other classes and interfaces.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, artsylar. I'd seen that, but it didn't make sense to me. @cbuckley, why'd you delete your comment? I wouldn't have understood that passage without your help! –  akTed Jan 18 '13 at 0:53
    
@AKTed looking at your extra examples, it wasn't quite correct. It didn't really explain why your example #3 works! Going to do some deeper digging to answer that one. –  cmbuckley Jan 18 '13 at 0:55
    
@AKTed there are a couple of bugs related to your question, but neither give any details on the internals that would explain why any of your examples work. In fact, I'd go as far as to say that they're all undefined behaviour and shouldn't be relied upon :-) –  cmbuckley Jan 19 '13 at 13:10

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