Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I asked this question earlier but couldnt find answer.. First of all sorry for my english..

I have a form include 80 checkboxes : these checkboxes are options for car ,
example for car ; Mp3 Player | ABS | Airbag | Air conditioning |

User should select his own cars options from checkboxes and post it.. The question is ? How should i store them in database? By the way user should able to update them later..

Should i use implode() and store them like

option1 , option2 , option34 , option45 , option66 ,  in one column

or like that

Car_ID | Options | 
155      option2
155      option34
155      option45
155      option66 

( How should they update them? )

or open 80 column in database and like ,

Car_ID | Option1 | Option2 | Option3 | Option4 | Option5
155         true     true      false     false     false
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should have an options table, a users table, and a user_options table that relates them. This will allow you to easily modify the options as necessary and add or remove options.

Users
user_id,username

Options
option_id,option_name

User Options
option_id,user_id

if each user can have multiple cars it should be:

Users
user_id,username

Options
option_id,option_name

Cars
car_id,car_name

User_Car_Options
user_id,car_id,option_id
share|improve this answer
    
how should they update options_? for example user checked Mp3 Player by mistaken and post it , then he unchecked it .. ? –  OMahoooo Jan 18 '13 at 0:49
    
There are lots of ways to do it on the front end. To be user friendly, I would use AJAX if possible and bind an event to the checkbox change event. Then I would submit a 1 or a 0 to my application and do the backend stuff. Ideally the user id would be stored in the session, and the car id should be submitted also from a hidden input field. –  Ethan Jan 18 '13 at 0:51

best way is like that

+---------+----------+----------+----------+
| Car_ID  | Option1  | Option2  | Option3  |
+---------+----------+----------+----------+
| 1       | TRUE     | FALSE    | NULL     |
| 2       | TRUE     | NULL     | FALSE    |
| 3       | NULL     | TRUE     | FALSE    |
+---------+----------+----------+----------+

(If you feel this would clutter your original table, you could also simply put these columns in a separate table and set up a 1:N relationship between them)

EDIT :

But, if the checkboxes are dynamic, and you want to be able to add/remove boxes from the list, you may want to set up a N:M relationship, where each row in your table could have a value for each checkbox. This would require a separate table to store the ceckboxes, and an intermediary table to store the values each row in table A has for each checkbox. Like:

/* Your table */
+-----+
| AID | 
+-----+ 
| 1   |
| 2   |
| 3   | 
+-----+

/* The table for the boxes */
+-------+-------+
| BoxID | Label |
+-------+-------+
| 1     | Box1  |
| 2     | Box2  |
| 3     | Box3  |
+-------+-------+

/* The intermediary table 
 * linking them together */
+-----+-------+-------+
| AID | BoxID | Value |
+-----+-------+-------+
| 1   | 1     | TRUE  |
| 1   | 2     | FALSE |
| 2   | 1     | TRUE  |
| 2   | 3     | FALSE |
| 3   | 2     | TRUE  |
| 3   | 3     | FALSE |
+-----+-------+-------+
share|improve this answer
1  
Might work for some applications, but not best practice. See Ethan's idea. –  showdev Jan 18 '13 at 0:40
    
edited my answer –  echo_Me Jan 18 '13 at 0:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.